ULTIMATE GYMCEL GUIDE

barettrealrx

barettrealrx

I wanna impregnate my oneitis
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Sep 23, 2023
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1. Ideal Phsyqiue
2. Split
3. Routine
4. Progressive overload
4. Failure
5. Reps in reserve
6. Rep Ranges
7. Factors behind hypertrophy
8. Sport specific training
9. Hypertrophy vs hyperplasia
10. Lactic Acid/Fatigue
11. The big 3

12. No leg day?
13. Diet
14. Types of Macronutrients
15. Vitamins and minerals
16. Supplements
17. How to track calories
18.
Cutting and bulking
19. Accessories

20. Playlist
21. Glossary

22. Useful media, links

https://exrx.net/Lists/Directory
Refer to this for the exercises I list in the routines.


THE IDEAL PHSYIQUE

The ideal physique is shaped like the letter "V". The shoulder to waist ratio should be 1.6 or higher. It should be 15% body fat or less.

SPLIT

There are a bunch of training splits out there, however I will give my reasons for why most are inferior.

Bro split:
5 day split where each muscle group is allocated to it's own day (chest, back, shoulders, arms, legs)


It has insufficient frequency for each muscle group, studies have consistently shown that hitting a muscle group 2x a week will yield the most results.

PPL split:
6 day split that pairs the muscles that work together on their own training days, i.e the muscles that push, the muscles that pull, the leg muscles on their own days, repeating the cycle 2x a week.

This split is insufficient for growing the arms, as after the chest and back work you will be too fatigued to hit arms properly.


Upper/Lower Split:
This split divides workouts into upper body and lower body sessions. Upper body days typically focus on chest, back, shoulders, and arms, while lower body days target legs and core.


It has the same problem as the PPL split, that it doesn't sufficiently hit the arms, as you are too fatigued after the chest and back work to hit arms properly.



Full Body Split


A full-body split involves targeting all major muscle groups in one session,

This leads to fatigue that can compromise performance on the muscle groups exercises later in the session like arms and shoulders. This issue is similar to those in PPL and Upper-Lower splits but can be more pronounced due to hitting all muscles in a single session.


MY SPLIT


Day 1chest triceps shoulder
Day 2back biceps
Day 3
Day 4chest shoulders
Day 5back
Day 6biceps triceps
Day 7
Day 8


8 day split so you take 3 rest days every 8 days it's 5/4 days a week.

My Training
Day 1:
Incline bench press 3x6
Pec deck OR Cable flies 3x8
Lateral raises 4x10
pushdowns 3x10
Skullcrushers 3x8

Day 2:
Seated cable row OR t bar row 4x8
lat pulldown supinated 4x8
Alternating db curls 3x10
facepulls 3x8

Day 3:
rest or cardio or sport

Day 4:
Incline bench press 4x6
Pec deck OR cable flies 4x8
Upright row 3x10
Lateral raises 4x10

Day 5:
Seated Cable row OR T bar row 4x8
Lat pulldown pronated 4x8


Day 6:

Tricep pressdowns 3x10
EZ bar skullcrushers 3x10
Alternating DB curls 4x8
Preacher curls 4x8

Day 7:
rest or cardio or sport

Day 8:

rest or cardio or sport


Footnotes:
I would recommend going 1-2 RIR on each exercise.

Progressive Overload

Progressive overload is one of the main factors behind muscle growrth, and it is the idea that every workout session, you should go harder than last time on the exercise. There are 2 main ways to do this

1. Add an extra rep.
2. Add an extra 2.5/5 lbs


Failure

Failure in lifting is when you do reps to the point you cannot do anymore. There are 2 types of failure:

Absolute failure: doing reps until failure and then using techniques (like partials, assisted reps) to lift the weight until you can't even move the weight.

technical failure: doing reps to failure, and stopping at the point at which your technique/form becomes worse



Reps in reserve

Rreps in reserve, or commonly abbreviated to RIR, is how many reps you have until technical failure.


Rep Ranges

Rep refers to a repetition of an exercise. Rep range refers to the range of how many reps you do.

1-5 reps = strength training
6-12 reps = Muscle growth
13+ reps = endurance

Theoretically, the same muscle can be grown in all reps 5-30, however in the higher rep ranges, you will fatigue before reaching the level needed to see real muscle growth


Factors behind Hypertrophy

There are 3 main factors to what drives hypertrophy.

1
. Muscle Damage
2. Mechanical tension
3. Metabolic stress

Metabolic stress refers to the buildup of metabolites (such as lactic acid) , or what you feel as fatigue, within the muscle cells during exercise. This stress is believed to stimulate muscle growth by triggering the release of growth factors and promoting cellular adaptations.

Mechanical tension is the force exerted on the muscle fibers during resistance training, such as when lifting weights. This tension creates micro-tears in the muscle fibers, signaling the body to repair and strengthen them to better handle future stress.

Muscle damage occurs when the muscle fibers experience excessive strain or overload during exercise, leading to microscopic damage or tears in the muscle tissue. This damage triggers an inflammatory response and activates satellite cells, which are responsible for repairing and rebuilding the damaged muscle fibers, resulting in muscle growth and adaptation over time.

As the muscle adapts to the damage you are giving it, you must overload the muscle with either more reps or weight, meaning ultimately, progressive overload is the main factor behind hypertrophy, it being an adaptation to keep these 3 activating.


Sport specific Training

Not including pylometrics.


Day 1 - Upper Body Strength

1. Bench Press - 5 sets of 5 reps
2. Barbell Rows - 4 sets of 8 reps
3. Incline Dumbbell Press - 3 sets of 10 reps
4. Pull-ups - 3 sets to failure
5. Tricep Pushdowns - 3 sets of 12 reps

Day 2 - Lower Body Strength

1. Squats - 5 sets of 5 reps
2. Deadlifts - 4 sets of 8 reps
3. Lunges - 3 sets of 10 reps per leg
4. Leg Curls - 3 sets of 12 reps
5. Calf Raises - 3 sets of 15 reps

Day 3 - Rest

Day 4 - Upper Body Hypertrophy


1. Incline Bench Press - 4 sets of 12 reps
2. Bent Over Rows - 4 sets of 10 reps
3. Dumbbell Shoulder Press - 3 sets of 12 reps
4. Chin-ups - 3 sets to failure
5. Bicep Curls - 3 sets of 15 reps



Day 5 - Lower Body Hypertrophy
1. Front Squats - 4 sets of 12 reps
2. Romanian Deadlifts - 4 sets of 10 reps
3. Leg Press - 3 sets of 12 reps
4. Seated Leg Curls - 3 sets of 15 reps
5. Standing Calf Raises - 3 sets of 20 reps
Day 6 - Rest



Day 1: Full Body
Clean and jerk 3x5
Squat 3x5
Dumbbell bench press 3x10
Dumbbell row 3x10

Day 2: Full Body
Clean and hang 3x5
Situps 3x10

Day 3: Full Body
Clean and jerk 3x5
Squat 3x5
Dumbbell bench press 3x10
Dumbbell row 3x10

Hypertrophy vs Hyperplasia

Hypertrophy is the primary mechanism by which muscles grow in response to resistance training. When you lift weights, the muscle fibers experience stress and damage. In response to this stress, the muscle cells increase in size through the process of hypertrophy. This results in larger, stronger muscles.

Hyperplasia, on the other hand, is less common in the context of muscle growth. While some studies suggest that muscle hyperplasia may occur in response to extreme training stimuli, the predominant mechanism for muscle growth in bodybuilding is hypertrophy.

Therefore, in bodybuilding, the goal is typically to induce hypertrophy in the muscle fibers through resistance training, proper nutrition, and adequate recovery. This leads to an increase in muscle size and strength over time. Hyperplasia may play a role to a lesser extent, but hypertrophy is the main driver of muscle growth in bodybuilding.


Lactic Acid

Lactic acid, also known as lactate, is a byproduct of the process of glycolysis, which is the breakdown of glucose for energy during intense exercise. In the context of lifting weights, lactic acid is produced when the muscles are working hard and oxygen demand exceeds supply, leading to anaerobic metabolism.

When you lift weights, your muscles require energy to contract and perform the movements. If the intensity of the exercise is high or if you are performing a high number of repetitions, your body may not be able to deliver enough oxygen to the working muscles to meet their energy demands. In this case, the muscles switch to anaerobic metabolism, where glucose is broken down in the absence of oxygen to produce energy.

During anaerobic metabolism, lactic acid is produced as a byproduct. The accumulation of lactic acid in the muscle tissue can lead to the sensation of muscle fatigue, burning, and discomfort during high-intensity weightlifting sessions. This sensation is often referred to as the "burn" and is a result of the build-up of lactic acid in the muscles.

It is important to note that lactic acid is not the sole cause of muscle fatigue during weightlifting, and current research suggests that it may actually be beneficial for muscle growth and adaptation. It can act as a fuel source for muscles and stimulate the release of growth factors that promote muscle repair and growth.

Ultimately, lactic acid is a natural byproduct of intense exercise, including weightlifting, and its presence can contribute to muscle fatigue and the burning sensation experienced during high-intensity workouts.


The big 3

The big 3, in both powerlifting and bodybuilding refers to squat, flat bench press, and deadlift.

I don't like these exercises as

Squat trains legs, which I feel is unnecessary

Flat bench press doesn't train the upper chest much, which is the important part for aesthetics, it should be replaced with incline bench press.

Deadlift is the worst lift in terms of its effort to hypertrophy ratio. It trains the posterior chain, mainly the spinal erectors and the glutes. It really only makes the back thicker, not wider, which is what is actually important for aesthetics.


No leg day?

The reason I didn't include a leg day in my routine was that legs aren't important for aesthetics. A v taper (wide shoulders and narrow waist) is preferable to a x taper (wide shoulders, narrow waist, and wide legs)


DIET

To begin, it would not be good for me to give everyone reading an exact diet to follow. That is why I will give general guidelines for making a diet.

The 2 most important things in a diet is

1. Your eating enough/not too much
2. Your getting in enough protein


I'll list good sources of each of the 3 macronutrients, you can pick a couple foods from each.

Protein:
Milk
Meat
Eggs
Peanut butter

Carbs:
Fruit
Non starchy vegetables (vegetables aside potatoes and corn)

Fat:
Fatty fish
Nuts
Avocados
Olive oil

Types of Macronutrients

We must understand there are 3 macronutrients that we need to consume to survive


1. Protein

This macro nutrient is used by the body to repair tissue, including muscle. It is made out of amino acids. Eat 1 gram of protein per lb of body weight (i.e if you weigh 200 lbs, eat 200 grams of protein).


2. Carbohydrates

This is the macronutrient that provides short term energy. It aids in recovery by replenishing glycogen stores. If you are cutting/ losing weight you should minimize how many carbohydrates you intake.


3. Fat

This is the macronutrient that provides long term energy. It's calorie dense in comparison to carbs or protein.



There are 2 types of fat,

Unsaturated fat
Considered healthy

Saturated fat
Unhealthy

Sources:
fatty meat
Chocolate
fried foods
ice cream

VITAMINS AND MINERALS

Vitamins and minerals are essential nutrients that the body needs in small amounts to function properly. They play vital roles in various physiological processes, including metabolism, immune function, and overall health.

Vitamins are organic compounds that are required in minute quantities and typically obtained through diet

Vitamins are classified into two categories: fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, and K) and water-soluble vitamins (B-complex vitamins and vitamin C). Fat-soluble vitamins are stored in the body's fatty tissues and liver and are best absorbed when consumed with dietary fats. Water-soluble vitamins dissolve in water and are not stored in the body, so they need to be consumed regularly through diet or supplementation.

Minerals are inorganic elements found in soil and water that are absorbed by plants and animals.

Minerals are categorized into two groups based on their required daily intake: macrominerals (such as calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, sodium, potassium, and chloride) and trace minerals (such as iron, zinc, copper, selenium, iodine, chromium, manganese, and molybdenum). Macrominerals are needed in larger amounts, while trace minerals are required in smaller quantities but are equally essential for various physiological functions.

Each vitamin and mineral plays specific roles in the body. For example, vitamin D is essential for calcium absorption and bone health, while vitamin C is crucial for collagen synthesis and immune function. Minerals like iron are necessary for oxygen transport in the blood, while potassium and sodium are electrolytes important for nerve function and fluid balance.

They are in general not that important for bodybuilding, more so for general health. If you eat a balanced diet eating all micronutrients you won't have to worry about it, however you can get a micronutrient if you are deficient.



SUPPLEMENTS
Here are some useful supplements you should take

1. Creatine Monohydrate:

• Enhances strength and power.

• Increases muscle mass.

• Boosts phosphocreatine levels for rapid energy production during intense exercise.

2. Fish Oil:

• Supports heart health by reducing inflammation and improving cholesterol levels.

• Enhances brain function and cognitive health.

• Promotes healthy skin and joints.

3. Magnesium:

• Supports muscle and nerve function.

• Aids in energy metabolism.

• Promotes bone health and regulates blood sugar levels.

4. Whey:

• Provides high-quality protein for muscle building and repair.

• Facilitates faster recovery after workouts.

• Convenient and easily absorbed protein source.

5. Multivitamin:

• Fills nutrient gaps in the diet.

• Supports overall health and well-being.

• Ensures adequate intake of essential vitamins and minerals for optimal functioning.


How to track how many calories you eat

1. Use a food scale to measure how much the food your eating weighs.
2. Use the app "MyFitnessPal" to log the food in and track how many calories your eating per day, get as close to your calorie goal as possible, to know how many calories to eat, see below.



Cutting and bulking


What is a BMR and a TDEE?

The amount of calories you burn by just existing is known as your Basal Metabolic rate, or BMR. Adding the amount of calories you burn by exercising and day to day activities, you get your TDEE (Total Daily Energy Expenditure).

BMR + Calories burnt thru exercising and day to day activities = TDEE

How to calculate TDEE?

https://www.health-calc.com/diet/energy-expenditure-advanced

What is caloric surplus/bulking?

Bulking is a caloric surplus, done in order to gain muscle mass. This will come with fat gain too, making it important to limit how much surplus you have. 500 is a good amount

What is a caloric deficit/cutting?

Cutting is a caloric deficit done in order to lose weight, however it will come with some muscle loss, making it important to eat more protein during a cut. 500 is a good deficit.

How long to do each?

You are mean to do each for at least 6 months, and then swap to the other one.

Which one should I do first as a beginner?

If your skinny fat (a fat belly with skinny arms), I would recommend bulking first.
If your fat fat, cut.
If your skinny, bulk


Accessories

Weightlifting gloves

Gloves used in lifting. Used to prevent calluses
Lifting straps

Straps used in pulling exercises, wouldn't recommend until your lifts are really heavy and you feel like you need them.

Knee wraps

Wraps around the knee, used to assist in squatting, can squat a bit more weight with these, wouldn't recommend, until your squats 300 lbs+

Lifting belt

Belt that goes around the waist, used to keep tension in the waist during deadlifts, squats, and overhead lifts. Wouldn't recommend until you go really heavy.

Gym bag

Bag you can put your stuff inside

Slingshot

Stuff t shirt to help you bench more. Wouldn't recommend until your bench is 300 lbs+

Weightlifting shoes

Shoes with a flat bottom used for lifting, provides a good base unlike shoes with cushiony bottoms which will inhibit your full strength on squat and deadlift.


Playlist
https://open.spotify.com/playlist/58MTHsky0b3UgUD5JLprgJ?si=wELAzQYZTJOompaZFnKJdg


Glossary

Rep - a repetition of an exercise
Barbell - a long bar you put plates on the end of
Dumbbell - a short bar with weights on the end
BB - Barbell
DB - Dumbbell
Dyel - Do you even lift?, referring to a person who lifts but doesn't look like they do.
Plate - Heavy circle you put on barbells
Calisthenics - Exercise using your own body



Useful Media/Links



Arnold Schwarzeneggers Encyclopedia of Modern Bodybuilding
https://archive.org/details/encyclopediaofmo00schw

How Heavy are the dumbbells you lift?

1712783984945


Natural Hypertrophy
https://youtube.com/@NaturalHypertrophy?si=S0A7Pp-zSyQXJmbo

House of Hypertrophy
https://youtube.com/@HouseofHypertrophy?si=SHp5H1CdxA0e6C1X

4chan /fit/
https://boards.4chan.org/fit//

Bodybuilding.com Forum
https://shop.bodybuilding.com/

 
Last edited:
  • +1
Reactions: sub5pslathlete, youraveragehtn, habeebullah and 12 others
1. Ideal Phsyqiue
2. Split
3. Routine
4. Progressive overload
4. Failure
5. Reps in reserve
6. Rep Ranges
7. Factors behind hypertrophy
8. Sport specific training
9. Hypertrophy vs hyperplasia
10. Lactic Acid/Fatigue
11. The big 3

12. No leg day?
13. Diet
14. Types of Macronutrients
15. Vitamins and minerals
16. Supplements
17. How to track calories
18.
Cutting and bulking
19. Accessories

20. Playlist
21. Glossary

22. Useful media, links

THE IDEAL PHSYIQUE

The ideal physique is shaped like the letter "V". The shoulder to waist ratio should be 1.6 or higher. It should be 15% body fat or less.

SPLIT

There are a bunch of training splits out there, however I will give my reasons for why most are inferior.

Bro split:
5 day split where each muscle group is allocated to it's own day (chest, back, shoulders, arms, legs)


It has insufficient frequency for each muscle group, studies have consistently shown that hitting a muscle group 2x a week will yield the most results.

PPL split:
6 day split that pairs the muscles that work together on their own training days, i.e the muscles that push, the muscles that pull, the leg muscles on their own days, repeating the cycle 2x a week.

This split is insufficient for growing the arms, as after the chest and back work you will be too fatigued to hit arms properly.


Upper/Lower Split:
This split divides workouts into upper body and lower body sessions. Upper body days typically focus on chest, back, shoulders, and arms, while lower body days target legs and core.


It has the same problem as the PPL split, that it doesn't sufficiently hit the arms, as you are too fatigued after the chest and back work to hit arms properly.



Full Body Split


A full-body split involves targeting all major muscle groups in one session,

This leads to fatigue that can compromise performance on the muscle groups exercises later in the session like arms and shoulders. This issue is similar to those in PPL and Upper-Lower splits but can be more pronounced due to hitting all muscles in a single session.


MY SPLIT


Day 1chest triceps shoulder
Day 2back biceps
Day 3
Day 4chest shoulders
Day 5back
Day 6biceps triceps
Day 7
Day 8


8 day split so you take 3 rest days every 8 days it's 5/4 days a week.

My Training
Day 1:
Incline bench press 3x6
Pec deck OR Cable flies 3x8
Lateral raises 4x10
pushdowns 3x10
Skullcrushers 3x8

Day 2:
Seated cable row OR t bar row 4x8
lat pulldown supinated 4x8
Alternating db curls 3x10
facepulls 3x8

Day 3:
rest or cardio or sport

Day 4:
Incline bench press 4x6
Pec deck OR cable flies 4x8
Upright row 3x10
Lateral raises 4x10

Day 5:
Seated Cable row OR T bar row 4x8
Lat pulldown pronated 4x8


Day 6:

Tricep pressdowns 3x10
EZ bar skullcrushers 3x10
Alternating DB curls 4x8
Preacher curls 4x8

Day 7:
rest or cardio or sport

Day 8:

rest or cardio or sport


Footnotes:
I would recommend going 1-2 RIR on each exercise.

Progressive Overload

Progressive overload is one of the main factors behind muscle growrth, and it is the idea that every workout session, you should go harder than last time on the exercise. There are 2 main ways to do this

1. Add an extra rep.
2. Add an extra 2.5/5 lbs


Failure

Failure in lifting is when you do reps to the point you cannot do anymore. There are 2 types of failure:

Absolute failure: doing reps until failure and then using techniques (like partials, assisted reps) to lift the weight until you can't even move the weight.

technical failure: doing reps to failure, and stopping at the point at which your technique/form becomes worse



Reps in reserve

Rreps in reserve, or commonly abbreviated to RIR, is how many reps you have until technical failure.


Rep Ranges

Rep refers to a repetition of an exercise. Rep range refers to the range of how many reps you do.

1-5 reps = strength training
6-12 reps = Muscle growth
13+ reps = endurance

Theoretically, the same muscle can be grown in all reps 5-30, however in the higher rep ranges, you will fatigue before reaching the level needed to see real muscle growth


Factors behind Hypertrophy

There are 3 main factors to what drives hypertrophy.

1
. Muscle Damage
2. Mechanical tension
3. Metabolic stress

Metabolic stress refers to the buildup of metabolites (such as lactic acid) , or what you feel as fatigue, within the muscle cells during exercise. This stress is believed to stimulate muscle growth by triggering the release of growth factors and promoting cellular adaptations.

Mechanical tension is the force exerted on the muscle fibers during resistance training, such as when lifting weights. This tension creates micro-tears in the muscle fibers, signaling the body to repair and strengthen them to better handle future stress.

Muscle damage occurs when the muscle fibers experience excessive strain or overload during exercise, leading to microscopic damage or tears in the muscle tissue. This damage triggers an inflammatory response and activates satellite cells, which are responsible for repairing and rebuilding the damaged muscle fibers, resulting in muscle growth and adaptation over time.

As the muscle adapts to the damage you are giving it, you must overload the muscle with either more reps or weight, meaning ultimately, progressive overload is the main factor behind hypertrophy, it being an adaptation to keep these 3 activating.


Sport specific Training

Not including pylometrics.


Day 1 - Upper Body Strength

1. Bench Press - 5 sets of 5 reps
2. Barbell Rows - 4 sets of 8 reps
3. Incline Dumbbell Press - 3 sets of 10 reps
4. Pull-ups - 3 sets to failure
5. Tricep Pushdowns - 3 sets of 12 reps

Day 2 - Lower Body Strength

1. Squats - 5 sets of 5 reps
2. Deadlifts - 4 sets of 8 reps
3. Lunges - 3 sets of 10 reps per leg
4. Leg Curls - 3 sets of 12 reps
5. Calf Raises - 3 sets of 15 reps

Day 3 - Rest

Day 4 - Upper Body Hypertrophy


1. Incline Bench Press - 4 sets of 12 reps
2. Bent Over Rows - 4 sets of 10 reps
3. Dumbbell Shoulder Press - 3 sets of 12 reps
4. Chin-ups - 3 sets to failure
5. Bicep Curls - 3 sets of 15 reps



Day 5 - Lower Body Hypertrophy
1. Front Squats - 4 sets of 12 reps
2. Romanian Deadlifts - 4 sets of 10 reps
3. Leg Press - 3 sets of 12 reps
4. Seated Leg Curls - 3 sets of 15 reps
5. Standing Calf Raises - 3 sets of 20 reps
Day 6 - Rest



Day 1: Full Body
Clean and jerk 3x5
Squat 3x5
Dumbbell bench press 3x10
Dumbbell row 3x10

Day 2: Full Body
Clean and hang 3x5
Situps 3x10

Day 3: Full Body
Clean and jerk 3x5
Squat 3x5
Dumbbell bench press 3x10
Dumbbell row 3x10

Hypertrophy vs Hyperplasia

Hypertrophy is the primary mechanism by which muscles grow in response to resistance training. When you lift weights, the muscle fibers experience stress and damage. In response to this stress, the muscle cells increase in size through the process of hypertrophy. This results in larger, stronger muscles.

Hyperplasia, on the other hand, is less common in the context of muscle growth. While some studies suggest that muscle hyperplasia may occur in response to extreme training stimuli, the predominant mechanism for muscle growth in bodybuilding is hypertrophy.

Therefore, in bodybuilding, the goal is typically to induce hypertrophy in the muscle fibers through resistance training, proper nutrition, and adequate recovery. This leads to an increase in muscle size and strength over time. Hyperplasia may play a role to a lesser extent, but hypertrophy is the main driver of muscle growth in bodybuilding.


Lactic Acid

Lactic acid, also known as lactate, is a byproduct of the process of glycolysis, which is the breakdown of glucose for energy during intense exercise. In the context of lifting weights, lactic acid is produced when the muscles are working hard and oxygen demand exceeds supply, leading to anaerobic metabolism.

When you lift weights, your muscles require energy to contract and perform the movements. If the intensity of the exercise is high or if you are performing a high number of repetitions, your body may not be able to deliver enough oxygen to the working muscles to meet their energy demands. In this case, the muscles switch to anaerobic metabolism, where glucose is broken down in the absence of oxygen to produce energy.

During anaerobic metabolism, lactic acid is produced as a byproduct. The accumulation of lactic acid in the muscle tissue can lead to the sensation of muscle fatigue, burning, and discomfort during high-intensity weightlifting sessions. This sensation is often referred to as the "burn" and is a result of the build-up of lactic acid in the muscles.

It is important to note that lactic acid is not the sole cause of muscle fatigue during weightlifting, and current research suggests that it may actually be beneficial for muscle growth and adaptation. It can act as a fuel source for muscles and stimulate the release of growth factors that promote muscle repair and growth.

Ultimately, lactic acid is a natural byproduct of intense exercise, including weightlifting, and its presence can contribute to muscle fatigue and the burning sensation experienced during high-intensity workouts.


The big 3

The big 3, in both powerlifting and bodybuilding refers to squat, flat bench press, and deadlift.

I don't like these exercises as

Squat trains legs, which I feel is unnecessary

Flat bench press doesn't train the upper chest much, which is the important part for aesthetics, it should be replaced with incline bench press.

Deadlift is the worst lift in terms of its effort to hypertrophy ratio. It trains the posterior chain, mainly the spinal erectors and the glutes. It really only makes the back thicker, not wider, which is what is actually important for aesthetics.


No leg day?

The reason I didn't include a leg day in my routine was that legs aren't important for aesthetics. A v taper (wide shoulders and narrow waist) is preferable to a x taper (wide shoulders, narrow waist, and wide legs)


DIET

To begin, it would not be good for me to give everyone reading an exact diet to follow. That is why I will give general guidelines for making a diet.

The 2 most important things in a diet is

1. Your eating enough/not too much
2. Your getting in enough protein


I'll list good sources of each of the 3 macronutrients, you can pick a couple foods from each.

Protein:
Milk
Meat
Eggs
Peanut butter

Carbs:
Fruit
Non starchy vegetables (vegetables aside potatoes and corn)

Fat:
Fatty fish
Nuts
Avocados
Olive oil

Types of Macronutrients

We must understand there are 3 macronutrients that we need to consume to survive


1. Protein

This macro nutrient is used by the body to repair tissue, including muscle. It is made out of amino acids. Eat 1 gram of protein per lb of body weight (i.e if you weigh 200 lbs, eat 200 grams of protein).


2. Carbohydrates

This is the macronutrient that provides short term energy. It aids in recovery by replenishing glycogen stores. If you are cutting/ losing weight you should minimize how many carbohydrates you intake.


3. Fat

This is the macronutrient that provides long term energy. It's calorie dense in comparison to carbs or protein.



There are 2 types of fat,

Unsaturated fat
Considered healthy

Saturated fat
Unhealthy

Sources:
fatty meat
Chocolate
fried foods
ice cream

VITAMINS AND MINERALS

Vitamins and minerals are essential nutrients that the body needs in small amounts to function properly. They play vital roles in various physiological processes, including metabolism, immune function, and overall health.

Vitamins are organic compounds that are required in minute quantities and typically obtained through diet

Vitamins are classified into two categories: fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, and K) and water-soluble vitamins (B-complex vitamins and vitamin C). Fat-soluble vitamins are stored in the body's fatty tissues and liver and are best absorbed when consumed with dietary fats. Water-soluble vitamins dissolve in water and are not stored in the body, so they need to be consumed regularly through diet or supplementation.

Minerals are inorganic elements found in soil and water that are absorbed by plants and animals.

Minerals are categorized into two groups based on their required daily intake: macrominerals (such as calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, sodium, potassium, and chloride) and trace minerals (such as iron, zinc, copper, selenium, iodine, chromium, manganese, and molybdenum). Macrominerals are needed in larger amounts, while trace minerals are required in smaller quantities but are equally essential for various physiological functions.

Each vitamin and mineral plays specific roles in the body. For example, vitamin D is essential for calcium absorption and bone health, while vitamin C is crucial for collagen synthesis and immune function. Minerals like iron are necessary for oxygen transport in the blood, while potassium and sodium are electrolytes important for nerve function and fluid balance.

They are in general not that important for bodybuilding, more so for general health. If you eat a balanced diet eating all micronutrients you won't have to worry about it, however you can get a micronutrient if you are deficient.



SUPPLEMENTS
Here are some useful supplements you should take

1. Creatine Monohydrate:

• Enhances strength and power.

• Increases muscle mass.

• Boosts phosphocreatine levels for rapid energy production during intense exercise.

2. Fish Oil:

• Supports heart health by reducing inflammation and improving cholesterol levels.

• Enhances brain function and cognitive health.

• Promotes healthy skin and joints.

3. Magnesium:

• Supports muscle and nerve function.

• Aids in energy metabolism.

• Promotes bone health and regulates blood sugar levels.

4. Whey:

• Provides high-quality protein for muscle building and repair.

• Facilitates faster recovery after workouts.

• Convenient and easily absorbed protein source.

5. Multivitamin:

• Fills nutrient gaps in the diet.

• Supports overall health and well-being.

• Ensures adequate intake of essential vitamins and minerals for optimal functioning.


How to track how many calories you eat

1. Use a food scale to measure how much the food your eating weighs.
2. Use the app "MyFitnessPal" to log the food in and track how many calories your eating per day, get as close to your calorie goal as possible, to know how many calories to eat, see below.




Cutting and bulking


What is a BMR and a TDEE?

The amount of calories you burn by just existing is known as your Basal Metabolic rate, or BMR. Adding the amount of calories you burn by exercising and day to day activities, you get your TDEE (Total Daily Energy Expenditure).

BMR + Calories burnt thru exercising and day to day activities = TDEE

How to calculate TDEE?

https://www.health-calc.com/diet/energy-expenditure-advanced

What is caloric surplus/bulking?

Bulking is a caloric surplus, done in order to gain muscle mass. This will come with fat gain too, making it important to limit how much surplus you have. 500 is a good amount

What is a caloric deficit/cutting?

Cutting is a caloric deficit done in order to lose weight, however it will come with some muscle loss, making it important to eat more protein during a cut. 500 is a good deficit.

How long to do each?

You are mean to do each for at least 6 months, and then swap to the other one.

Which one should I do first as a beginner?

If your skinny fat (a fat belly with skinny arms), I would recommend bulking first.
If your fat fat, cut.
If your skinny, bulk


Accessories

Weightlifting gloves

Gloves used in lifting. Used to prevent calluses
Lifting straps

Straps used in pulling exercises, wouldn't recommend until your lifts are really heavy and you feel like you need them.

Knee wraps

Wraps around the knee, used to assist in squatting, can squat a bit more weight with these, wouldn't recommend, until your squats 300 lbs+

Lifting belt

Belt that goes around the waist, used to keep tension in the waist during deadlifts, squats, and overhead lifts. Wouldn't recommend until you go really heavy.

Gym bag

Bag you can put your stuff inside

Slingshot

Stuff t shirt to help you bench more. Wouldn't recommend until your bench is 300 lbs+

Weightlifting shoes

Shoes with a flat bottom used for lifting, provides a good base unlike shoes with cushiony bottoms which will inhibit your full strength on squat and deadlift.


Playlist
https://open.spotify.com/playlist/58MTHsky0b3UgUD5JLprgJ?si=wELAzQYZTJOompaZFnKJdg


Glossary

Rep - a repetition of an exercise
Barbell - a long bar you put plates on the end of
Dumbbell - a short bar with weights on the end
BB - Barbell
DB - Dumbbell
Dyel - Do you even lift?, referring to a person who lifts but doesn't look like they do.
Plate - Heavy circle you put on barbells
Calisthenics - Exercise using your own body



Useful Media/Links



Arnold Schwarzeneggers Encyclopedia of Modern Bodybuilding
https://archive.org/details/encyclopediaofmo00schw

How Heavy are the dumbbells you lift?

View attachment 2851867

Natural Hypertrophy
https://youtube.com/@NaturalHypertrophy?si=S0A7Pp-zSyQXJmbo

House of Hypertrophy
https://youtube.com/@HouseofHypertrophy?si=SHp5H1CdxA0e6C1X

4chan /fit/
https://boards.4chan.org/fit//

Bodybuilding.com Forum
https://shop.bodybuilding.com/
I just do one hour of cardio and starve myself OP
 
  • +1
Reactions: nigkook and aveglyntmax
Absolutely ass workout splits
 
  • +1
Reactions: pagodagu
good thread but 80% is unnecessary.
if you want to gymcel, just go to the gym. have a good split, sleep well and eat good food. nothing more.
even lowest iq people can build a good physique.

Also you won't learn from the internet. if you are new to the gym, always go with someone or get a personal trainer. newbies don't know shit when reading things like 'incline bench' or 'progressive overload'.
 
  • +1
Reactions: pagodagu and barettrealrx
1. Ideal Phsyqiue
2. Split
3. Routine
4. Progressive overload
4. Failure
5. Reps in reserve
6. Rep Ranges
7. Factors behind hypertrophy
8. Sport specific training
9. Hypertrophy vs hyperplasia
10. Lactic Acid/Fatigue
11. The big 3

12. No leg day?
13. Diet
14. Types of Macronutrients
15. Vitamins and minerals
16. Supplements
17. How to track calories
18.
Cutting and bulking
19. Accessories

20. Playlist
21. Glossary

22. Useful media, links

https://exrx.net/Lists/Directory
Refer to this for the exercises I list in the routines.


THE IDEAL PHSYIQUE

The ideal physique is shaped like the letter "V". The shoulder to waist ratio should be 1.6 or higher. It should be 15% body fat or less.

SPLIT

There are a bunch of training splits out there, however I will give my reasons for why most are inferior.

Bro split:
5 day split where each muscle group is allocated to it's own day (chest, back, shoulders, arms, legs)


It has insufficient frequency for each muscle group, studies have consistently shown that hitting a muscle group 2x a week will yield the most results.

PPL split:
6 day split that pairs the muscles that work together on their own training days, i.e the muscles that push, the muscles that pull, the leg muscles on their own days, repeating the cycle 2x a week.

This split is insufficient for growing the arms, as after the chest and back work you will be too fatigued to hit arms properly.


Upper/Lower Split:
This split divides workouts into upper body and lower body sessions. Upper body days typically focus on chest, back, shoulders, and arms, while lower body days target legs and core.


It has the same problem as the PPL split, that it doesn't sufficiently hit the arms, as you are too fatigued after the chest and back work to hit arms properly.



Full Body Split


A full-body split involves targeting all major muscle groups in one session,

This leads to fatigue that can compromise performance on the muscle groups exercises later in the session like arms and shoulders. This issue is similar to those in PPL and Upper-Lower splits but can be more pronounced due to hitting all muscles in a single session.


MY SPLIT


Day 1chest triceps shoulder
Day 2back biceps
Day 3
Day 4chest shoulders
Day 5back
Day 6biceps triceps
Day 7
Day 8


8 day split so you take 3 rest days every 8 days it's 5/4 days a week.

My Training
Day 1:
Incline bench press 3x6
Pec deck OR Cable flies 3x8
Lateral raises 4x10
pushdowns 3x10
Skullcrushers 3x8

Day 2:
Seated cable row OR t bar row 4x8
lat pulldown supinated 4x8
Alternating db curls 3x10
facepulls 3x8

Day 3:
rest or cardio or sport

Day 4:
Incline bench press 4x6
Pec deck OR cable flies 4x8
Upright row 3x10
Lateral raises 4x10

Day 5:
Seated Cable row OR T bar row 4x8
Lat pulldown pronated 4x8


Day 6:

Tricep pressdowns 3x10
EZ bar skullcrushers 3x10
Alternating DB curls 4x8
Preacher curls 4x8

Day 7:
rest or cardio or sport

Day 8:

rest or cardio or sport


Footnotes:
I would recommend going 1-2 RIR on each exercise.

Progressive Overload

Progressive overload is one of the main factors behind muscle growrth, and it is the idea that every workout session, you should go harder than last time on the exercise. There are 2 main ways to do this

1. Add an extra rep.
2. Add an extra 2.5/5 lbs


Failure

Failure in lifting is when you do reps to the point you cannot do anymore. There are 2 types of failure:

Absolute failure: doing reps until failure and then using techniques (like partials, assisted reps) to lift the weight until you can't even move the weight.

technical failure: doing reps to failure, and stopping at the point at which your technique/form becomes worse



Reps in reserve

Rreps in reserve, or commonly abbreviated to RIR, is how many reps you have until technical failure.


Rep Ranges

Rep refers to a repetition of an exercise. Rep range refers to the range of how many reps you do.

1-5 reps = strength training
6-12 reps = Muscle growth
13+ reps = endurance

Theoretically, the same muscle can be grown in all reps 5-30, however in the higher rep ranges, you will fatigue before reaching the level needed to see real muscle growth


Factors behind Hypertrophy

There are 3 main factors to what drives hypertrophy.

1
. Muscle Damage
2. Mechanical tension
3. Metabolic stress

Metabolic stress refers to the buildup of metabolites (such as lactic acid) , or what you feel as fatigue, within the muscle cells during exercise. This stress is believed to stimulate muscle growth by triggering the release of growth factors and promoting cellular adaptations.

Mechanical tension is the force exerted on the muscle fibers during resistance training, such as when lifting weights. This tension creates micro-tears in the muscle fibers, signaling the body to repair and strengthen them to better handle future stress.

Muscle damage occurs when the muscle fibers experience excessive strain or overload during exercise, leading to microscopic damage or tears in the muscle tissue. This damage triggers an inflammatory response and activates satellite cells, which are responsible for repairing and rebuilding the damaged muscle fibers, resulting in muscle growth and adaptation over time.

As the muscle adapts to the damage you are giving it, you must overload the muscle with either more reps or weight, meaning ultimately, progressive overload is the main factor behind hypertrophy, it being an adaptation to keep these 3 activating.


Sport specific Training

Not including pylometrics.


Day 1 - Upper Body Strength

1. Bench Press - 5 sets of 5 reps
2. Barbell Rows - 4 sets of 8 reps
3. Incline Dumbbell Press - 3 sets of 10 reps
4. Pull-ups - 3 sets to failure
5. Tricep Pushdowns - 3 sets of 12 reps

Day 2 - Lower Body Strength

1. Squats - 5 sets of 5 reps
2. Deadlifts - 4 sets of 8 reps
3. Lunges - 3 sets of 10 reps per leg
4. Leg Curls - 3 sets of 12 reps
5. Calf Raises - 3 sets of 15 reps

Day 3 - Rest

Day 4 - Upper Body Hypertrophy


1. Incline Bench Press - 4 sets of 12 reps
2. Bent Over Rows - 4 sets of 10 reps
3. Dumbbell Shoulder Press - 3 sets of 12 reps
4. Chin-ups - 3 sets to failure
5. Bicep Curls - 3 sets of 15 reps



Day 5 - Lower Body Hypertrophy
1. Front Squats - 4 sets of 12 reps
2. Romanian Deadlifts - 4 sets of 10 reps
3. Leg Press - 3 sets of 12 reps
4. Seated Leg Curls - 3 sets of 15 reps
5. Standing Calf Raises - 3 sets of 20 reps
Day 6 - Rest



Day 1: Full Body
Clean and jerk 3x5
Squat 3x5
Dumbbell bench press 3x10
Dumbbell row 3x10

Day 2: Full Body
Clean and hang 3x5
Situps 3x10

Day 3: Full Body
Clean and jerk 3x5
Squat 3x5
Dumbbell bench press 3x10
Dumbbell row 3x10

Hypertrophy vs Hyperplasia

Hypertrophy is the primary mechanism by which muscles grow in response to resistance training. When you lift weights, the muscle fibers experience stress and damage. In response to this stress, the muscle cells increase in size through the process of hypertrophy. This results in larger, stronger muscles.

Hyperplasia, on the other hand, is less common in the context of muscle growth. While some studies suggest that muscle hyperplasia may occur in response to extreme training stimuli, the predominant mechanism for muscle growth in bodybuilding is hypertrophy.

Therefore, in bodybuilding, the goal is typically to induce hypertrophy in the muscle fibers through resistance training, proper nutrition, and adequate recovery. This leads to an increase in muscle size and strength over time. Hyperplasia may play a role to a lesser extent, but hypertrophy is the main driver of muscle growth in bodybuilding.


Lactic Acid

Lactic acid, also known as lactate, is a byproduct of the process of glycolysis, which is the breakdown of glucose for energy during intense exercise. In the context of lifting weights, lactic acid is produced when the muscles are working hard and oxygen demand exceeds supply, leading to anaerobic metabolism.

When you lift weights, your muscles require energy to contract and perform the movements. If the intensity of the exercise is high or if you are performing a high number of repetitions, your body may not be able to deliver enough oxygen to the working muscles to meet their energy demands. In this case, the muscles switch to anaerobic metabolism, where glucose is broken down in the absence of oxygen to produce energy.

During anaerobic metabolism, lactic acid is produced as a byproduct. The accumulation of lactic acid in the muscle tissue can lead to the sensation of muscle fatigue, burning, and discomfort during high-intensity weightlifting sessions. This sensation is often referred to as the "burn" and is a result of the build-up of lactic acid in the muscles.

It is important to note that lactic acid is not the sole cause of muscle fatigue during weightlifting, and current research suggests that it may actually be beneficial for muscle growth and adaptation. It can act as a fuel source for muscles and stimulate the release of growth factors that promote muscle repair and growth.

Ultimately, lactic acid is a natural byproduct of intense exercise, including weightlifting, and its presence can contribute to muscle fatigue and the burning sensation experienced during high-intensity workouts.


The big 3

The big 3, in both powerlifting and bodybuilding refers to squat, flat bench press, and deadlift.

I don't like these exercises as

Squat trains legs, which I feel is unnecessary

Flat bench press doesn't train the upper chest much, which is the important part for aesthetics, it should be replaced with incline bench press.

Deadlift is the worst lift in terms of its effort to hypertrophy ratio. It trains the posterior chain, mainly the spinal erectors and the glutes. It really only makes the back thicker, not wider, which is what is actually important for aesthetics.


No leg day?

The reason I didn't include a leg day in my routine was that legs aren't important for aesthetics. A v taper (wide shoulders and narrow waist) is preferable to a x taper (wide shoulders, narrow waist, and wide legs)


DIET

To begin, it would not be good for me to give everyone reading an exact diet to follow. That is why I will give general guidelines for making a diet.

The 2 most important things in a diet is

1. Your eating enough/not too much
2. Your getting in enough protein


I'll list good sources of each of the 3 macronutrients, you can pick a couple foods from each.

Protein:
Milk
Meat
Eggs
Peanut butter

Carbs:
Fruit
Non starchy vegetables (vegetables aside potatoes and corn)

Fat:
Fatty fish
Nuts
Avocados
Olive oil

Types of Macronutrients

We must understand there are 3 macronutrients that we need to consume to survive


1. Protein

This macro nutrient is used by the body to repair tissue, including muscle. It is made out of amino acids. Eat 1 gram of protein per lb of body weight (i.e if you weigh 200 lbs, eat 200 grams of protein).


2. Carbohydrates

This is the macronutrient that provides short term energy. It aids in recovery by replenishing glycogen stores. If you are cutting/ losing weight you should minimize how many carbohydrates you intake.


3. Fat

This is the macronutrient that provides long term energy. It's calorie dense in comparison to carbs or protein.



There are 2 types of fat,

Unsaturated fat
Considered healthy

Saturated fat
Unhealthy

Sources:
fatty meat
Chocolate
fried foods
ice cream

VITAMINS AND MINERALS

Vitamins and minerals are essential nutrients that the body needs in small amounts to function properly. They play vital roles in various physiological processes, including metabolism, immune function, and overall health.

Vitamins are organic compounds that are required in minute quantities and typically obtained through diet

Vitamins are classified into two categories: fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, and K) and water-soluble vitamins (B-complex vitamins and vitamin C). Fat-soluble vitamins are stored in the body's fatty tissues and liver and are best absorbed when consumed with dietary fats. Water-soluble vitamins dissolve in water and are not stored in the body, so they need to be consumed regularly through diet or supplementation.

Minerals are inorganic elements found in soil and water that are absorbed by plants and animals.

Minerals are categorized into two groups based on their required daily intake: macrominerals (such as calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, sodium, potassium, and chloride) and trace minerals (such as iron, zinc, copper, selenium, iodine, chromium, manganese, and molybdenum). Macrominerals are needed in larger amounts, while trace minerals are required in smaller quantities but are equally essential for various physiological functions.

Each vitamin and mineral plays specific roles in the body. For example, vitamin D is essential for calcium absorption and bone health, while vitamin C is crucial for collagen synthesis and immune function. Minerals like iron are necessary for oxygen transport in the blood, while potassium and sodium are electrolytes important for nerve function and fluid balance.

They are in general not that important for bodybuilding, more so for general health. If you eat a balanced diet eating all micronutrients you won't have to worry about it, however you can get a micronutrient if you are deficient.



SUPPLEMENTS
Here are some useful supplements you should take

1. Creatine Monohydrate:

• Enhances strength and power.

• Increases muscle mass.

• Boosts phosphocreatine levels for rapid energy production during intense exercise.

2. Fish Oil:

• Supports heart health by reducing inflammation and improving cholesterol levels.

• Enhances brain function and cognitive health.

• Promotes healthy skin and joints.

3. Magnesium:

• Supports muscle and nerve function.

• Aids in energy metabolism.

• Promotes bone health and regulates blood sugar levels.

4. Whey:

• Provides high-quality protein for muscle building and repair.

• Facilitates faster recovery after workouts.

• Convenient and easily absorbed protein source.

5. Multivitamin:

• Fills nutrient gaps in the diet.

• Supports overall health and well-being.

• Ensures adequate intake of essential vitamins and minerals for optimal functioning.


How to track how many calories you eat

1. Use a food scale to measure how much the food your eating weighs.
2. Use the app "MyFitnessPal" to log the food in and track how many calories your eating per day, get as close to your calorie goal as possible, to know how many calories to eat, see below.




Cutting and bulking


What is a BMR and a TDEE?

The amount of calories you burn by just existing is known as your Basal Metabolic rate, or BMR. Adding the amount of calories you burn by exercising and day to day activities, you get your TDEE (Total Daily Energy Expenditure).

BMR + Calories burnt thru exercising and day to day activities = TDEE

How to calculate TDEE?

https://www.health-calc.com/diet/energy-expenditure-advanced

What is caloric surplus/bulking?

Bulking is a caloric surplus, done in order to gain muscle mass. This will come with fat gain too, making it important to limit how much surplus you have. 500 is a good amount

What is a caloric deficit/cutting?

Cutting is a caloric deficit done in order to lose weight, however it will come with some muscle loss, making it important to eat more protein during a cut. 500 is a good deficit.

How long to do each?

You are mean to do each for at least 6 months, and then swap to the other one.

Which one should I do first as a beginner?

If your skinny fat (a fat belly with skinny arms), I would recommend bulking first.
If your fat fat, cut.
If your skinny, bulk


Accessories

Weightlifting gloves

Gloves used in lifting. Used to prevent calluses
Lifting straps

Straps used in pulling exercises, wouldn't recommend until your lifts are really heavy and you feel like you need them.

Knee wraps

Wraps around the knee, used to assist in squatting, can squat a bit more weight with these, wouldn't recommend, until your squats 300 lbs+

Lifting belt

Belt that goes around the waist, used to keep tension in the waist during deadlifts, squats, and overhead lifts. Wouldn't recommend until you go really heavy.

Gym bag

Bag you can put your stuff inside

Slingshot

Stuff t shirt to help you bench more. Wouldn't recommend until your bench is 300 lbs+

Weightlifting shoes

Shoes with a flat bottom used for lifting, provides a good base unlike shoes with cushiony bottoms which will inhibit your full strength on squat and deadlift.


Playlist
https://open.spotify.com/playlist/58MTHsky0b3UgUD5JLprgJ?si=wELAzQYZTJOompaZFnKJdg


Glossary

Rep - a repetition of an exercise
Barbell - a long bar you put plates on the end of
Dumbbell - a short bar with weights on the end
BB - Barbell
DB - Dumbbell
Dyel - Do you even lift?, referring to a person who lifts but doesn't look like they do.
Plate - Heavy circle you put on barbells
Calisthenics - Exercise using your own body



Useful Media/Links



Arnold Schwarzeneggers Encyclopedia of Modern Bodybuilding
https://archive.org/details/encyclopediaofmo00schw

How Heavy are the dumbbells you lift?

View attachment 2851867

Natural Hypertrophy
https://youtube.com/@NaturalHypertrophy?si=S0A7Pp-zSyQXJmbo

House of Hypertrophy
https://youtube.com/@HouseofHypertrophy?si=SHp5H1CdxA0e6C1X

4chan /fit/
https://boards.4chan.org/fit//

Bodybuilding.com Forum
https://shop.bodybuilding.com/


Bump
 

1. Ideal Phsyqiue
2. Split
3. Routine
4. Progressive overload
4. Failure
5. Reps in reserve
6. Rep Ranges
7. Factors behind hypertrophy
8. Sport specific training
9. Hypertrophy vs hyperplasia
10. Lactic Acid/Fatigue
11. The big 3

12. No leg day?
13. Diet
14. Types of Macronutrients
15. Vitamins and minerals
16. Supplements
17. How to track calories
18.
Cutting and bulking
19. Accessories

20. Playlist
21. Glossary

22. Useful media, links

https://exrx.net/Lists/Directory
Refer to this for the exercises I list in the routines.


THE IDEAL PHSYIQUE

The ideal physique is shaped like the letter "V". The shoulder to waist ratio should be 1.6 or higher. It should be 15% body fat or less.

SPLIT

There are a bunch of training splits out there, however I will give my reasons for why most are inferior.

Bro split:
5 day split where each muscle group is allocated to it's own day (chest, back, shoulders, arms, legs)


It has insufficient frequency for each muscle group, studies have consistently shown that hitting a muscle group 2x a week will yield the most results.

PPL split:
6 day split that pairs the muscles that work together on their own training days, i.e the muscles that push, the muscles that pull, the leg muscles on their own days, repeating the cycle 2x a week.

This split is insufficient for growing the arms, as after the chest and back work you will be too fatigued to hit arms properly.


Upper/Lower Split:
This split divides workouts into upper body and lower body sessions. Upper body days typically focus on chest, back, shoulders, and arms, while lower body days target legs and core.


It has the same problem as the PPL split, that it doesn't sufficiently hit the arms, as you are too fatigued after the chest and back work to hit arms properly.



Full Body Split


A full-body split involves targeting all major muscle groups in one session,

This leads to fatigue that can compromise performance on the muscle groups exercises later in the session like arms and shoulders. This issue is similar to those in PPL and Upper-Lower splits but can be more pronounced due to hitting all muscles in a single session.


MY SPLIT


Day 1chest triceps shoulder
Day 2back biceps
Day 3
Day 4chest shoulders
Day 5back
Day 6biceps triceps
Day 7
Day 8


8 day split so you take 3 rest days every 8 days it's 5/4 days a week.

My Training
Day 1:
Incline bench press 3x6
Pec deck OR Cable flies 3x8
Lateral raises 4x10
pushdowns 3x10
Skullcrushers 3x8

Day 2:
Seated cable row OR t bar row 4x8
lat pulldown supinated 4x8
Alternating db curls 3x10
facepulls 3x8

Day 3:
rest or cardio or sport

Day 4:
Incline bench press 4x6
Pec deck OR cable flies 4x8
Upright row 3x10
Lateral raises 4x10

Day 5:
Seated Cable row OR T bar row 4x8
Lat pulldown pronated 4x8


Day 6:

Tricep pressdowns 3x10
EZ bar skullcrushers 3x10
Alternating DB curls 4x8
Preacher curls 4x8

Day 7:
rest or cardio or sport

Day 8:

rest or cardio or sport


Footnotes:
I would recommend going 1-2 RIR on each exercise.

Progressive Overload

Progressive overload is one of the main factors behind muscle growrth, and it is the idea that every workout session, you should go harder than last time on the exercise. There are 2 main ways to do this

1. Add an extra rep.
2. Add an extra 2.5/5 lbs


Failure

Failure in lifting is when you do reps to the point you cannot do anymore. There are 2 types of failure:

Absolute failure: doing reps until failure and then using techniques (like partials, assisted reps) to lift the weight until you can't even move the weight.

technical failure: doing reps to failure, and stopping at the point at which your technique/form becomes worse



Reps in reserve

Rreps in reserve, or commonly abbreviated to RIR, is how many reps you have until technical failure.


Rep Ranges

Rep refers to a repetition of an exercise. Rep range refers to the range of how many reps you do.

1-5 reps = strength training
6-12 reps = Muscle growth
13+ reps = endurance

Theoretically, the same muscle can be grown in all reps 5-30, however in the higher rep ranges, you will fatigue before reaching the level needed to see real muscle growth


Factors behind Hypertrophy

There are 3 main factors to what drives hypertrophy.

1
. Muscle Damage
2. Mechanical tension
3. Metabolic stress

Metabolic stress refers to the buildup of metabolites (such as lactic acid) , or what you feel as fatigue, within the muscle cells during exercise. This stress is believed to stimulate muscle growth by triggering the release of growth factors and promoting cellular adaptations.

Mechanical tension is the force exerted on the muscle fibers during resistance training, such as when lifting weights. This tension creates micro-tears in the muscle fibers, signaling the body to repair and strengthen them to better handle future stress.

Muscle damage occurs when the muscle fibers experience excessive strain or overload during exercise, leading to microscopic damage or tears in the muscle tissue. This damage triggers an inflammatory response and activates satellite cells, which are responsible for repairing and rebuilding the damaged muscle fibers, resulting in muscle growth and adaptation over time.

As the muscle adapts to the damage you are giving it, you must overload the muscle with either more reps or weight, meaning ultimately, progressive overload is the main factor behind hypertrophy, it being an adaptation to keep these 3 activating.


Sport specific Training

Not including pylometrics.


Day 1 - Upper Body Strength

1. Bench Press - 5 sets of 5 reps
2. Barbell Rows - 4 sets of 8 reps
3. Incline Dumbbell Press - 3 sets of 10 reps
4. Pull-ups - 3 sets to failure
5. Tricep Pushdowns - 3 sets of 12 reps

Day 2 - Lower Body Strength

1. Squats - 5 sets of 5 reps
2. Deadlifts - 4 sets of 8 reps
3. Lunges - 3 sets of 10 reps per leg
4. Leg Curls - 3 sets of 12 reps
5. Calf Raises - 3 sets of 15 reps

Day 3 - Rest

Day 4 - Upper Body Hypertrophy


1. Incline Bench Press - 4 sets of 12 reps
2. Bent Over Rows - 4 sets of 10 reps
3. Dumbbell Shoulder Press - 3 sets of 12 reps
4. Chin-ups - 3 sets to failure
5. Bicep Curls - 3 sets of 15 reps



Day 5 - Lower Body Hypertrophy
1. Front Squats - 4 sets of 12 reps
2. Romanian Deadlifts - 4 sets of 10 reps
3. Leg Press - 3 sets of 12 reps
4. Seated Leg Curls - 3 sets of 15 reps
5. Standing Calf Raises - 3 sets of 20 reps
Day 6 - Rest



Day 1: Full Body
Clean and jerk 3x5
Squat 3x5
Dumbbell bench press 3x10
Dumbbell row 3x10

Day 2: Full Body
Clean and hang 3x5
Situps 3x10

Day 3: Full Body
Clean and jerk 3x5
Squat 3x5
Dumbbell bench press 3x10
Dumbbell row 3x10

Hypertrophy vs Hyperplasia

Hypertrophy is the primary mechanism by which muscles grow in response to resistance training. When you lift weights, the muscle fibers experience stress and damage. In response to this stress, the muscle cells increase in size through the process of hypertrophy. This results in larger, stronger muscles.

Hyperplasia, on the other hand, is less common in the context of muscle growth. While some studies suggest that muscle hyperplasia may occur in response to extreme training stimuli, the predominant mechanism for muscle growth in bodybuilding is hypertrophy.

Therefore, in bodybuilding, the goal is typically to induce hypertrophy in the muscle fibers through resistance training, proper nutrition, and adequate recovery. This leads to an increase in muscle size and strength over time. Hyperplasia may play a role to a lesser extent, but hypertrophy is the main driver of muscle growth in bodybuilding.


Lactic Acid

Lactic acid, also known as lactate, is a byproduct of the process of glycolysis, which is the breakdown of glucose for energy during intense exercise. In the context of lifting weights, lactic acid is produced when the muscles are working hard and oxygen demand exceeds supply, leading to anaerobic metabolism.

When you lift weights, your muscles require energy to contract and perform the movements. If the intensity of the exercise is high or if you are performing a high number of repetitions, your body may not be able to deliver enough oxygen to the working muscles to meet their energy demands. In this case, the muscles switch to anaerobic metabolism, where glucose is broken down in the absence of oxygen to produce energy.

During anaerobic metabolism, lactic acid is produced as a byproduct. The accumulation of lactic acid in the muscle tissue can lead to the sensation of muscle fatigue, burning, and discomfort during high-intensity weightlifting sessions. This sensation is often referred to as the "burn" and is a result of the build-up of lactic acid in the muscles.

It is important to note that lactic acid is not the sole cause of muscle fatigue during weightlifting, and current research suggests that it may actually be beneficial for muscle growth and adaptation. It can act as a fuel source for muscles and stimulate the release of growth factors that promote muscle repair and growth.

Ultimately, lactic acid is a natural byproduct of intense exercise, including weightlifting, and its presence can contribute to muscle fatigue and the burning sensation experienced during high-intensity workouts.


The big 3

The big 3, in both powerlifting and bodybuilding refers to squat, flat bench press, and deadlift.

I don't like these exercises as

Squat trains legs, which I feel is unnecessary

Flat bench press doesn't train the upper chest much, which is the important part for aesthetics, it should be replaced with incline bench press.

Deadlift is the worst lift in terms of its effort to hypertrophy ratio. It trains the posterior chain, mainly the spinal erectors and the glutes. It really only makes the back thicker, not wider, which is what is actually important for aesthetics.


No leg day?

The reason I didn't include a leg day in my routine was that legs aren't important for aesthetics. A v taper (wide shoulders and narrow waist) is preferable to a x taper (wide shoulders, narrow waist, and wide legs)


DIET

To begin, it would not be good for me to give everyone reading an exact diet to follow. That is why I will give general guidelines for making a diet.

The 2 most important things in a diet is

1. Your eating enough/not too much
2. Your getting in enough protein


I'll list good sources of each of the 3 macronutrients, you can pick a couple foods from each.

Protein:
Milk
Meat
Eggs
Peanut butter

Carbs:
Fruit
Non starchy vegetables (vegetables aside potatoes and corn)

Fat:
Fatty fish
Nuts
Avocados
Olive oil

Types of Macronutrients

We must understand there are 3 macronutrients that we need to consume to survive


1. Protein

This macro nutrient is used by the body to repair tissue, including muscle. It is made out of amino acids. Eat 1 gram of protein per lb of body weight (i.e if you weigh 200 lbs, eat 200 grams of protein).


2. Carbohydrates

This is the macronutrient that provides short term energy. It aids in recovery by replenishing glycogen stores. If you are cutting/ losing weight you should minimize how many carbohydrates you intake.


3. Fat

This is the macronutrient that provides long term energy. It's calorie dense in comparison to carbs or protein.



There are 2 types of fat,

Unsaturated fat
Considered healthy

Saturated fat
Unhealthy

Sources:
fatty meat
Chocolate
fried foods
ice cream

VITAMINS AND MINERALS

Vitamins and minerals are essential nutrients that the body needs in small amounts to function properly. They play vital roles in various physiological processes, including metabolism, immune function, and overall health.

Vitamins are organic compounds that are required in minute quantities and typically obtained through diet

Vitamins are classified into two categories: fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, and K) and water-soluble vitamins (B-complex vitamins and vitamin C). Fat-soluble vitamins are stored in the body's fatty tissues and liver and are best absorbed when consumed with dietary fats. Water-soluble vitamins dissolve in water and are not stored in the body, so they need to be consumed regularly through diet or supplementation.

Minerals are inorganic elements found in soil and water that are absorbed by plants and animals.

Minerals are categorized into two groups based on their required daily intake: macrominerals (such as calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, sodium, potassium, and chloride) and trace minerals (such as iron, zinc, copper, selenium, iodine, chromium, manganese, and molybdenum). Macrominerals are needed in larger amounts, while trace minerals are required in smaller quantities but are equally essential for various physiological functions.

Each vitamin and mineral plays specific roles in the body. For example, vitamin D is essential for calcium absorption and bone health, while vitamin C is crucial for collagen synthesis and immune function. Minerals like iron are necessary for oxygen transport in the blood, while potassium and sodium are electrolytes important for nerve function and fluid balance.

They are in general not that important for bodybuilding, more so for general health. If you eat a balanced diet eating all micronutrients you won't have to worry about it, however you can get a micronutrient if you are deficient.



SUPPLEMENTS
Here are some useful supplements you should take

1. Creatine Monohydrate:

• Enhances strength and power.

• Increases muscle mass.

• Boosts phosphocreatine levels for rapid energy production during intense exercise.

2. Fish Oil:

• Supports heart health by reducing inflammation and improving cholesterol levels.

• Enhances brain function and cognitive health.

• Promotes healthy skin and joints.

3. Magnesium:

• Supports muscle and nerve function.

• Aids in energy metabolism.

• Promotes bone health and regulates blood sugar levels.

4. Whey:

• Provides high-quality protein for muscle building and repair.

• Facilitates faster recovery after workouts.

• Convenient and easily absorbed protein source.

5. Multivitamin:

• Fills nutrient gaps in the diet.

• Supports overall health and well-being.

• Ensures adequate intake of essential vitamins and minerals for optimal functioning.


How to track how many calories you eat

1. Use a food scale to measure how much the food your eating weighs.
2. Use the app "MyFitnessPal" to log the food in and track how many calories your eating per day, get as close to your calorie goal as possible, to know how many calories to eat, see below.




Cutting and bulking


What is a BMR and a TDEE?

The amount of calories you burn by just existing is known as your Basal Metabolic rate, or BMR. Adding the amount of calories you burn by exercising and day to day activities, you get your TDEE (Total Daily Energy Expenditure).

BMR + Calories burnt thru exercising and day to day activities = TDEE

How to calculate TDEE?

https://www.health-calc.com/diet/energy-expenditure-advanced

What is caloric surplus/bulking?

Bulking is a caloric surplus, done in order to gain muscle mass. This will come with fat gain too, making it important to limit how much surplus you have. 500 is a good amount

What is a caloric deficit/cutting?

Cutting is a caloric deficit done in order to lose weight, however it will come with some muscle loss, making it important to eat more protein during a cut. 500 is a good deficit.

How long to do each?

You are mean to do each for at least 6 months, and then swap to the other one.

Which one should I do first as a beginner?

If your skinny fat (a fat belly with skinny arms), I would recommend bulking first.
If your fat fat, cut.
If your skinny, bulk


Accessories

Weightlifting gloves

Gloves used in lifting. Used to prevent calluses
Lifting straps

Straps used in pulling exercises, wouldn't recommend until your lifts are really heavy and you feel like you need them.

Knee wraps

Wraps around the knee, used to assist in squatting, can squat a bit more weight with these, wouldn't recommend, until your squats 300 lbs+

Lifting belt

Belt that goes around the waist, used to keep tension in the waist during deadlifts, squats, and overhead lifts. Wouldn't recommend until you go really heavy.

Gym bag

Bag you can put your stuff inside

Slingshot

Stuff t shirt to help you bench more. Wouldn't recommend until your bench is 300 lbs+

Weightlifting shoes

Shoes with a flat bottom used for lifting, provides a good base unlike shoes with cushiony bottoms which will inhibit your full strength on squat and deadlift.


Playlist
https://open.spotify.com/playlist/58MTHsky0b3UgUD5JLprgJ?si=wELAzQYZTJOompaZFnKJdg


Glossary

Rep - a repetition of an exercise
Barbell - a long bar you put plates on the end of
Dumbbell - a short bar with weights on the end
BB - Barbell
DB - Dumbbell
Dyel - Do you even lift?, referring to a person who lifts but doesn't look like they do.
Plate - Heavy circle you put on barbells
Calisthenics - Exercise using your own body



Useful Media/Links



Arnold Schwarzeneggers Encyclopedia of Modern Bodybuilding
https://archive.org/details/encyclopediaofmo00schw

How Heavy are the dumbbells you lift?

View attachment 2851867

Natural Hypertrophy
https://youtube.com/@NaturalHypertrophy?si=S0A7Pp-zSyQXJmbo

House of Hypertrophy
https://youtube.com/@HouseofHypertrophy?si=SHp5H1CdxA0e6C1X

4chan /fit/
https://boards.4chan.org/fit//

Bodybuilding.com Forum
https://shop.bodybuilding.com/


Write all that for 0 likes 😂
 
1. Ideal Phsyqiue
2. Split
3. Routine
4. Progressive overload
4. Failure
5. Reps in reserve
6. Rep Ranges
7. Factors behind hypertrophy
8. Sport specific training
9. Hypertrophy vs hyperplasia
10. Lactic Acid/Fatigue
11. The big 3

12. No leg day?
13. Diet
14. Types of Macronutrients
15. Vitamins and minerals
16. Supplements
17. How to track calories
18.
Cutting and bulking
19. Accessories

20. Playlist
21. Glossary

22. Useful media, links

https://exrx.net/Lists/Directory
Refer to this for the exercises I list in the routines.


THE IDEAL PHSYIQUE

The ideal physique is shaped like the letter "V". The shoulder to waist ratio should be 1.6 or higher. It should be 15% body fat or less.

SPLIT

There are a bunch of training splits out there, however I will give my reasons for why most are inferior.

Bro split:
5 day split where each muscle group is allocated to it's own day (chest, back, shoulders, arms, legs)


It has insufficient frequency for each muscle group, studies have consistently shown that hitting a muscle group 2x a week will yield the most results.

PPL split:
6 day split that pairs the muscles that work together on their own training days, i.e the muscles that push, the muscles that pull, the leg muscles on their own days, repeating the cycle 2x a week.

This split is insufficient for growing the arms, as after the chest and back work you will be too fatigued to hit arms properly.


Upper/Lower Split:
This split divides workouts into upper body and lower body sessions. Upper body days typically focus on chest, back, shoulders, and arms, while lower body days target legs and core.


It has the same problem as the PPL split, that it doesn't sufficiently hit the arms, as you are too fatigued after the chest and back work to hit arms properly.



Full Body Split


A full-body split involves targeting all major muscle groups in one session,

This leads to fatigue that can compromise performance on the muscle groups exercises later in the session like arms and shoulders. This issue is similar to those in PPL and Upper-Lower splits but can be more pronounced due to hitting all muscles in a single session.


MY SPLIT


Day 1chest triceps shoulder
Day 2back biceps
Day 3
Day 4chest shoulders
Day 5back
Day 6biceps triceps
Day 7
Day 8


8 day split so you take 3 rest days every 8 days it's 5/4 days a week.

My Training
Day 1:
Incline bench press 3x6
Pec deck OR Cable flies 3x8
Lateral raises 4x10
pushdowns 3x10
Skullcrushers 3x8

Day 2:
Seated cable row OR t bar row 4x8
lat pulldown supinated 4x8
Alternating db curls 3x10
facepulls 3x8

Day 3:
rest or cardio or sport

Day 4:
Incline bench press 4x6
Pec deck OR cable flies 4x8
Upright row 3x10
Lateral raises 4x10

Day 5:
Seated Cable row OR T bar row 4x8
Lat pulldown pronated 4x8


Day 6:

Tricep pressdowns 3x10
EZ bar skullcrushers 3x10
Alternating DB curls 4x8
Preacher curls 4x8

Day 7:
rest or cardio or sport

Day 8:

rest or cardio or sport


Footnotes:
I would recommend going 1-2 RIR on each exercise.

Progressive Overload

Progressive overload is one of the main factors behind muscle growrth, and it is the idea that every workout session, you should go harder than last time on the exercise. There are 2 main ways to do this

1. Add an extra rep.
2. Add an extra 2.5/5 lbs


Failure

Failure in lifting is when you do reps to the point you cannot do anymore. There are 2 types of failure:

Absolute failure: doing reps until failure and then using techniques (like partials, assisted reps) to lift the weight until you can't even move the weight.

technical failure: doing reps to failure, and stopping at the point at which your technique/form becomes worse



Reps in reserve

Rreps in reserve, or commonly abbreviated to RIR, is how many reps you have until technical failure.


Rep Ranges

Rep refers to a repetition of an exercise. Rep range refers to the range of how many reps you do.

1-5 reps = strength training
6-12 reps = Muscle growth
13+ reps = endurance

Theoretically, the same muscle can be grown in all reps 5-30, however in the higher rep ranges, you will fatigue before reaching the level needed to see real muscle growth


Factors behind Hypertrophy

There are 3 main factors to what drives hypertrophy.

1
. Muscle Damage
2. Mechanical tension
3. Metabolic stress

Metabolic stress refers to the buildup of metabolites (such as lactic acid) , or what you feel as fatigue, within the muscle cells during exercise. This stress is believed to stimulate muscle growth by triggering the release of growth factors and promoting cellular adaptations.

Mechanical tension is the force exerted on the muscle fibers during resistance training, such as when lifting weights. This tension creates micro-tears in the muscle fibers, signaling the body to repair and strengthen them to better handle future stress.

Muscle damage occurs when the muscle fibers experience excessive strain or overload during exercise, leading to microscopic damage or tears in the muscle tissue. This damage triggers an inflammatory response and activates satellite cells, which are responsible for repairing and rebuilding the damaged muscle fibers, resulting in muscle growth and adaptation over time.

As the muscle adapts to the damage you are giving it, you must overload the muscle with either more reps or weight, meaning ultimately, progressive overload is the main factor behind hypertrophy, it being an adaptation to keep these 3 activating.


Sport specific Training

Not including pylometrics.


Day 1 - Upper Body Strength

1. Bench Press - 5 sets of 5 reps
2. Barbell Rows - 4 sets of 8 reps
3. Incline Dumbbell Press - 3 sets of 10 reps
4. Pull-ups - 3 sets to failure
5. Tricep Pushdowns - 3 sets of 12 reps

Day 2 - Lower Body Strength

1. Squats - 5 sets of 5 reps
2. Deadlifts - 4 sets of 8 reps
3. Lunges - 3 sets of 10 reps per leg
4. Leg Curls - 3 sets of 12 reps
5. Calf Raises - 3 sets of 15 reps

Day 3 - Rest

Day 4 - Upper Body Hypertrophy


1. Incline Bench Press - 4 sets of 12 reps
2. Bent Over Rows - 4 sets of 10 reps
3. Dumbbell Shoulder Press - 3 sets of 12 reps
4. Chin-ups - 3 sets to failure
5. Bicep Curls - 3 sets of 15 reps



Day 5 - Lower Body Hypertrophy
1. Front Squats - 4 sets of 12 reps
2. Romanian Deadlifts - 4 sets of 10 reps
3. Leg Press - 3 sets of 12 reps
4. Seated Leg Curls - 3 sets of 15 reps
5. Standing Calf Raises - 3 sets of 20 reps
Day 6 - Rest



Day 1: Full Body
Clean and jerk 3x5
Squat 3x5
Dumbbell bench press 3x10
Dumbbell row 3x10

Day 2: Full Body
Clean and hang 3x5
Situps 3x10

Day 3: Full Body
Clean and jerk 3x5
Squat 3x5
Dumbbell bench press 3x10
Dumbbell row 3x10

Hypertrophy vs Hyperplasia

Hypertrophy is the primary mechanism by which muscles grow in response to resistance training. When you lift weights, the muscle fibers experience stress and damage. In response to this stress, the muscle cells increase in size through the process of hypertrophy. This results in larger, stronger muscles.

Hyperplasia, on the other hand, is less common in the context of muscle growth. While some studies suggest that muscle hyperplasia may occur in response to extreme training stimuli, the predominant mechanism for muscle growth in bodybuilding is hypertrophy.

Therefore, in bodybuilding, the goal is typically to induce hypertrophy in the muscle fibers through resistance training, proper nutrition, and adequate recovery. This leads to an increase in muscle size and strength over time. Hyperplasia may play a role to a lesser extent, but hypertrophy is the main driver of muscle growth in bodybuilding.


Lactic Acid

Lactic acid, also known as lactate, is a byproduct of the process of glycolysis, which is the breakdown of glucose for energy during intense exercise. In the context of lifting weights, lactic acid is produced when the muscles are working hard and oxygen demand exceeds supply, leading to anaerobic metabolism.

When you lift weights, your muscles require energy to contract and perform the movements. If the intensity of the exercise is high or if you are performing a high number of repetitions, your body may not be able to deliver enough oxygen to the working muscles to meet their energy demands. In this case, the muscles switch to anaerobic metabolism, where glucose is broken down in the absence of oxygen to produce energy.

During anaerobic metabolism, lactic acid is produced as a byproduct. The accumulation of lactic acid in the muscle tissue can lead to the sensation of muscle fatigue, burning, and discomfort during high-intensity weightlifting sessions. This sensation is often referred to as the "burn" and is a result of the build-up of lactic acid in the muscles.

It is important to note that lactic acid is not the sole cause of muscle fatigue during weightlifting, and current research suggests that it may actually be beneficial for muscle growth and adaptation. It can act as a fuel source for muscles and stimulate the release of growth factors that promote muscle repair and growth.

Ultimately, lactic acid is a natural byproduct of intense exercise, including weightlifting, and its presence can contribute to muscle fatigue and the burning sensation experienced during high-intensity workouts.


The big 3

The big 3, in both powerlifting and bodybuilding refers to squat, flat bench press, and deadlift.

I don't like these exercises as

Squat trains legs, which I feel is unnecessary

Flat bench press doesn't train the upper chest much, which is the important part for aesthetics, it should be replaced with incline bench press.

Deadlift is the worst lift in terms of its effort to hypertrophy ratio. It trains the posterior chain, mainly the spinal erectors and the glutes. It really only makes the back thicker, not wider, which is what is actually important for aesthetics.


No leg day?

The reason I didn't include a leg day in my routine was that legs aren't important for aesthetics. A v taper (wide shoulders and narrow waist) is preferable to a x taper (wide shoulders, narrow waist, and wide legs)


DIET

To begin, it would not be good for me to give everyone reading an exact diet to follow. That is why I will give general guidelines for making a diet.

The 2 most important things in a diet is

1. Your eating enough/not too much
2. Your getting in enough protein


I'll list good sources of each of the 3 macronutrients, you can pick a couple foods from each.

Protein:
Milk
Meat
Eggs
Peanut butter

Carbs:
Fruit
Non starchy vegetables (vegetables aside potatoes and corn)

Fat:
Fatty fish
Nuts
Avocados
Olive oil

Types of Macronutrients

We must understand there are 3 macronutrients that we need to consume to survive


1. Protein

This macro nutrient is used by the body to repair tissue, including muscle. It is made out of amino acids. Eat 1 gram of protein per lb of body weight (i.e if you weigh 200 lbs, eat 200 grams of protein).


2. Carbohydrates

This is the macronutrient that provides short term energy. It aids in recovery by replenishing glycogen stores. If you are cutting/ losing weight you should minimize how many carbohydrates you intake.


3. Fat

This is the macronutrient that provides long term energy. It's calorie dense in comparison to carbs or protein.



There are 2 types of fat,

Unsaturated fat
Considered healthy

Saturated fat
Unhealthy

Sources:
fatty meat
Chocolate
fried foods
ice cream

VITAMINS AND MINERALS

Vitamins and minerals are essential nutrients that the body needs in small amounts to function properly. They play vital roles in various physiological processes, including metabolism, immune function, and overall health.

Vitamins are organic compounds that are required in minute quantities and typically obtained through diet

Vitamins are classified into two categories: fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, and K) and water-soluble vitamins (B-complex vitamins and vitamin C). Fat-soluble vitamins are stored in the body's fatty tissues and liver and are best absorbed when consumed with dietary fats. Water-soluble vitamins dissolve in water and are not stored in the body, so they need to be consumed regularly through diet or supplementation.

Minerals are inorganic elements found in soil and water that are absorbed by plants and animals.

Minerals are categorized into two groups based on their required daily intake: macrominerals (such as calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, sodium, potassium, and chloride) and trace minerals (such as iron, zinc, copper, selenium, iodine, chromium, manganese, and molybdenum). Macrominerals are needed in larger amounts, while trace minerals are required in smaller quantities but are equally essential for various physiological functions.

Each vitamin and mineral plays specific roles in the body. For example, vitamin D is essential for calcium absorption and bone health, while vitamin C is crucial for collagen synthesis and immune function. Minerals like iron are necessary for oxygen transport in the blood, while potassium and sodium are electrolytes important for nerve function and fluid balance.

They are in general not that important for bodybuilding, more so for general health. If you eat a balanced diet eating all micronutrients you won't have to worry about it, however you can get a micronutrient if you are deficient.



SUPPLEMENTS
Here are some useful supplements you should take

1. Creatine Monohydrate:

• Enhances strength and power.

• Increases muscle mass.

• Boosts phosphocreatine levels for rapid energy production during intense exercise.

2. Fish Oil:

• Supports heart health by reducing inflammation and improving cholesterol levels.

• Enhances brain function and cognitive health.

• Promotes healthy skin and joints.

3. Magnesium:

• Supports muscle and nerve function.

• Aids in energy metabolism.

• Promotes bone health and regulates blood sugar levels.

4. Whey:

• Provides high-quality protein for muscle building and repair.

• Facilitates faster recovery after workouts.

• Convenient and easily absorbed protein source.

5. Multivitamin:

• Fills nutrient gaps in the diet.

• Supports overall health and well-being.

• Ensures adequate intake of essential vitamins and minerals for optimal functioning.


How to track how many calories you eat

1. Use a food scale to measure how much the food your eating weighs.
2. Use the app "MyFitnessPal" to log the food in and track how many calories your eating per day, get as close to your calorie goal as possible, to know how many calories to eat, see below.




Cutting and bulking


What is a BMR and a TDEE?

The amount of calories you burn by just existing is known as your Basal Metabolic rate, or BMR. Adding the amount of calories you burn by exercising and day to day activities, you get your TDEE (Total Daily Energy Expenditure).

BMR + Calories burnt thru exercising and day to day activities = TDEE

How to calculate TDEE?

https://www.health-calc.com/diet/energy-expenditure-advanced

What is caloric surplus/bulking?

Bulking is a caloric surplus, done in order to gain muscle mass. This will come with fat gain too, making it important to limit how much surplus you have. 500 is a good amount

What is a caloric deficit/cutting?

Cutting is a caloric deficit done in order to lose weight, however it will come with some muscle loss, making it important to eat more protein during a cut. 500 is a good deficit.

How long to do each?

You are mean to do each for at least 6 months, and then swap to the other one.

Which one should I do first as a beginner?

If your skinny fat (a fat belly with skinny arms), I would recommend bulking first.
If your fat fat, cut.
If your skinny, bulk


Accessories

Weightlifting gloves

Gloves used in lifting. Used to prevent calluses
Lifting straps

Straps used in pulling exercises, wouldn't recommend until your lifts are really heavy and you feel like you need them.

Knee wraps

Wraps around the knee, used to assist in squatting, can squat a bit more weight with these, wouldn't recommend, until your squats 300 lbs+

Lifting belt

Belt that goes around the waist, used to keep tension in the waist during deadlifts, squats, and overhead lifts. Wouldn't recommend until you go really heavy.

Gym bag

Bag you can put your stuff inside

Slingshot

Stuff t shirt to help you bench more. Wouldn't recommend until your bench is 300 lbs+

Weightlifting shoes

Shoes with a flat bottom used for lifting, provides a good base unlike shoes with cushiony bottoms which will inhibit your full strength on squat and deadlift.


Playlist
https://open.spotify.com/playlist/58MTHsky0b3UgUD5JLprgJ?si=wELAzQYZTJOompaZFnKJdg


Glossary

Rep - a repetition of an exercise
Barbell - a long bar you put plates on the end of
Dumbbell - a short bar with weights on the end
BB - Barbell
DB - Dumbbell
Dyel - Do you even lift?, referring to a person who lifts but doesn't look like they do.
Plate - Heavy circle you put on barbells
Calisthenics - Exercise using your own body



Useful Media/Links



Arnold Schwarzeneggers Encyclopedia of Modern Bodybuilding
https://archive.org/details/encyclopediaofmo00schw

How Heavy are the dumbbells you lift?

View attachment 2851867

Natural Hypertrophy
https://youtube.com/@NaturalHypertrophy?si=S0A7Pp-zSyQXJmbo

House of Hypertrophy
https://youtube.com/@HouseofHypertrophy?si=SHp5H1CdxA0e6C1X

4chan /fit/
https://boards.4chan.org/fit//

Bodybuilding.com Forum
https://shop.bodybuilding.com/


will read it later since im new to the gym looks useful
 
  • Love it
Reactions: barettrealrx
Calories dont really matter, hormones do!
 
  • WTF
Reactions: barettrealrx
Arnold Split mogs any other training split.
 
  • WTF
Reactions: barettrealrx
lot of effort/writing so ill rep. disagree with some things tho
 
  • +1
Reactions: barettrealrx
Water
 
  • +1
  • WTF
Reactions: nathan and barettrealrx
Deadlift is the worst lift in terms of its effort to hypertrophy ratio. It trains the posterior chain, mainly the spinal erectors and the glutes. It really only makes the back thicker, not wider, which is what is actually important for aesthetics.
It’s one of the most important lifts. And without any thickness to your physique you will look retarded.
Protein:
Milk
Meat
Eggs
Peanut butter

Carbs:
Fruit
Non starchy vegetables (vegetables aside potatoes and corn)

Fat:
Fatty fish
Nuts
Avocados
Olive oil
Store-bought peanut butter is full of anti nutrients and estrogenic. Making it yourself is not really worth it cuz its gonna go bad real quick. Just don’t eat it.

Carbs are a lot more important than the proteins and eating non-starchy ones really limits your food choices with little to no benefits. Just eat rice, potatoes, and bread. If you want something sweet, raw honey and fruits mogs.

As for fats, eat only animal-based ones plus olive olive and maybe coconut oil. Anything other than these are poison.

Bro you don’t know shit about anything. I’m not even getting on the training splits you recommend, jfled hard. Good luck though, lol
 
Last edited:
  • WTF
Reactions: barettrealrx
It’s one of the most important lifts. And without any thickness to your physique you will look retarded.

Store-bought peanut butter is full of anti nutrients and estrogenic. Making it yourself is not really worth it cuz its gonna go bad real quick. Just don’t eat it.

Carbs are a lot more important than the proteins and eating non-starchy ones really limits your food choices with little to no benefits.

As for fats, eat only animal-based ones plus olive olive and maybe coconut oil. Anything other than these are poison.

Bro you don’t know shit about anything. I’m not even getting on the training splits you recommend, jfled hard. Good luck though, lol
fuck you dumbass
 
Last edited:
water 🌊
 
  • +1
Reactions: bobt
All water but great formatting
 
  • Love it
Reactions: barettrealrx
will read later but def my split is better so idgaf
 
IMG 3838
below mid guide, dnrd, get mogged
 
  • WTF
Reactions: barettrealrx
That meant to be some sort of brag? Look like an average dude in a shirt guaranteed
yes. i do plus im 189cm so no matter how much hit the gym will never look big naturally:feelswhy:
 
  • So Sad
Reactions: barettrealrx
it takes me a week to recover from a workout
bro split is my only option
 
  • Hmm...
Reactions: barettrealrx
Critique my split (I have no rest days)
1713143038370

1713143053230

1713143062131
 
  • +1
Reactions: barettrealrx
Too much volume even on 1x frequency cut back to like 8-12 sets each muscle if ur going to actual failure
By failure I mean I don’t count reps and just go until I physically can do anymore
 
  • Love it
Reactions: barettrealrx
Do legs unless you want your back to be fucked by the time you're 40.
 
  • +1
Reactions: changemywayz
1. Ideal Phsyqiue
2. Split
3. Routine
4. Progressive overload
4. Failure
5. Reps in reserve
6. Rep Ranges
7. Factors behind hypertrophy
8. Sport specific training
9. Hypertrophy vs hyperplasia
10. Lactic Acid/Fatigue
11. The big 3

12. No leg day?
13. Diet
14. Types of Macronutrients
15. Vitamins and minerals
16. Supplements
17. How to track calories
18.
Cutting and bulking
19. Accessories

20. Playlist
21. Glossary

22. Useful media, links

https://exrx.net/Lists/Directory
Refer to this for the exercises I list in the routines.


THE IDEAL PHSYIQUE

The ideal physique is shaped like the letter "V". The shoulder to waist ratio should be 1.6 or higher. It should be 15% body fat or less.

SPLIT

There are a bunch of training splits out there, however I will give my reasons for why most are inferior.

Bro split:
5 day split where each muscle group is allocated to it's own day (chest, back, shoulders, arms, legs)


It has insufficient frequency for each muscle group, studies have consistently shown that hitting a muscle group 2x a week will yield the most results.

PPL split:
6 day split that pairs the muscles that work together on their own training days, i.e the muscles that push, the muscles that pull, the leg muscles on their own days, repeating the cycle 2x a week.

This split is insufficient for growing the arms, as after the chest and back work you will be too fatigued to hit arms properly.


Upper/Lower Split:
This split divides workouts into upper body and lower body sessions. Upper body days typically focus on chest, back, shoulders, and arms, while lower body days target legs and core.


It has the same problem as the PPL split, that it doesn't sufficiently hit the arms, as you are too fatigued after the chest and back work to hit arms properly.



Full Body Split


A full-body split involves targeting all major muscle groups in one session,

This leads to fatigue that can compromise performance on the muscle groups exercises later in the session like arms and shoulders. This issue is similar to those in PPL and Upper-Lower splits but can be more pronounced due to hitting all muscles in a single session.


MY SPLIT


Day 1chest triceps shoulder
Day 2back biceps
Day 3
Day 4chest shoulders
Day 5back
Day 6biceps triceps
Day 7
Day 8


8 day split so you take 3 rest days every 8 days it's 5/4 days a week.

My Training
Day 1:
Incline bench press 3x6
Pec deck OR Cable flies 3x8
Lateral raises 4x10
pushdowns 3x10
Skullcrushers 3x8

Day 2:
Seated cable row OR t bar row 4x8
lat pulldown supinated 4x8
Alternating db curls 3x10
facepulls 3x8

Day 3:
rest or cardio or sport

Day 4:
Incline bench press 4x6
Pec deck OR cable flies 4x8
Upright row 3x10
Lateral raises 4x10

Day 5:
Seated Cable row OR T bar row 4x8
Lat pulldown pronated 4x8


Day 6:

Tricep pressdowns 3x10
EZ bar skullcrushers 3x10
Alternating DB curls 4x8
Preacher curls 4x8

Day 7:
rest or cardio or sport

Day 8:

rest or cardio or sport


Footnotes:
I would recommend going 1-2 RIR on each exercise.

Progressive Overload

Progressive overload is one of the main factors behind muscle growrth, and it is the idea that every workout session, you should go harder than last time on the exercise. There are 2 main ways to do this

1. Add an extra rep.
2. Add an extra 2.5/5 lbs


Failure

Failure in lifting is when you do reps to the point you cannot do anymore. There are 2 types of failure:

Absolute failure: doing reps until failure and then using techniques (like partials, assisted reps) to lift the weight until you can't even move the weight.

technical failure: doing reps to failure, and stopping at the point at which your technique/form becomes worse



Reps in reserve

Rreps in reserve, or commonly abbreviated to RIR, is how many reps you have until technical failure.


Rep Ranges

Rep refers to a repetition of an exercise. Rep range refers to the range of how many reps you do.

1-5 reps = strength training
6-12 reps = Muscle growth
13+ reps = endurance

Theoretically, the same muscle can be grown in all reps 5-30, however in the higher rep ranges, you will fatigue before reaching the level needed to see real muscle growth


Factors behind Hypertrophy

There are 3 main factors to what drives hypertrophy.

1
. Muscle Damage
2. Mechanical tension
3. Metabolic stress

Metabolic stress refers to the buildup of metabolites (such as lactic acid) , or what you feel as fatigue, within the muscle cells during exercise. This stress is believed to stimulate muscle growth by triggering the release of growth factors and promoting cellular adaptations.

Mechanical tension is the force exerted on the muscle fibers during resistance training, such as when lifting weights. This tension creates micro-tears in the muscle fibers, signaling the body to repair and strengthen them to better handle future stress.

Muscle damage occurs when the muscle fibers experience excessive strain or overload during exercise, leading to microscopic damage or tears in the muscle tissue. This damage triggers an inflammatory response and activates satellite cells, which are responsible for repairing and rebuilding the damaged muscle fibers, resulting in muscle growth and adaptation over time.

As the muscle adapts to the damage you are giving it, you must overload the muscle with either more reps or weight, meaning ultimately, progressive overload is the main factor behind hypertrophy, it being an adaptation to keep these 3 activating.


Sport specific Training

Not including pylometrics.


Day 1 - Upper Body Strength

1. Bench Press - 5 sets of 5 reps
2. Barbell Rows - 4 sets of 8 reps
3. Incline Dumbbell Press - 3 sets of 10 reps
4. Pull-ups - 3 sets to failure
5. Tricep Pushdowns - 3 sets of 12 reps

Day 2 - Lower Body Strength

1. Squats - 5 sets of 5 reps
2. Deadlifts - 4 sets of 8 reps
3. Lunges - 3 sets of 10 reps per leg
4. Leg Curls - 3 sets of 12 reps
5. Calf Raises - 3 sets of 15 reps

Day 3 - Rest

Day 4 - Upper Body Hypertrophy


1. Incline Bench Press - 4 sets of 12 reps
2. Bent Over Rows - 4 sets of 10 reps
3. Dumbbell Shoulder Press - 3 sets of 12 reps
4. Chin-ups - 3 sets to failure
5. Bicep Curls - 3 sets of 15 reps



Day 5 - Lower Body Hypertrophy
1. Front Squats - 4 sets of 12 reps
2. Romanian Deadlifts - 4 sets of 10 reps
3. Leg Press - 3 sets of 12 reps
4. Seated Leg Curls - 3 sets of 15 reps
5. Standing Calf Raises - 3 sets of 20 reps
Day 6 - Rest



Day 1: Full Body
Clean and jerk 3x5
Squat 3x5
Dumbbell bench press 3x10
Dumbbell row 3x10

Day 2: Full Body
Clean and hang 3x5
Situps 3x10

Day 3: Full Body
Clean and jerk 3x5
Squat 3x5
Dumbbell bench press 3x10
Dumbbell row 3x10

Hypertrophy vs Hyperplasia

Hypertrophy is the primary mechanism by which muscles grow in response to resistance training. When you lift weights, the muscle fibers experience stress and damage. In response to this stress, the muscle cells increase in size through the process of hypertrophy. This results in larger, stronger muscles.

Hyperplasia, on the other hand, is less common in the context of muscle growth. While some studies suggest that muscle hyperplasia may occur in response to extreme training stimuli, the predominant mechanism for muscle growth in bodybuilding is hypertrophy.

Therefore, in bodybuilding, the goal is typically to induce hypertrophy in the muscle fibers through resistance training, proper nutrition, and adequate recovery. This leads to an increase in muscle size and strength over time. Hyperplasia may play a role to a lesser extent, but hypertrophy is the main driver of muscle growth in bodybuilding.


Lactic Acid

Lactic acid, also known as lactate, is a byproduct of the process of glycolysis, which is the breakdown of glucose for energy during intense exercise. In the context of lifting weights, lactic acid is produced when the muscles are working hard and oxygen demand exceeds supply, leading to anaerobic metabolism.

When you lift weights, your muscles require energy to contract and perform the movements. If the intensity of the exercise is high or if you are performing a high number of repetitions, your body may not be able to deliver enough oxygen to the working muscles to meet their energy demands. In this case, the muscles switch to anaerobic metabolism, where glucose is broken down in the absence of oxygen to produce energy.

During anaerobic metabolism, lactic acid is produced as a byproduct. The accumulation of lactic acid in the muscle tissue can lead to the sensation of muscle fatigue, burning, and discomfort during high-intensity weightlifting sessions. This sensation is often referred to as the "burn" and is a result of the build-up of lactic acid in the muscles.

It is important to note that lactic acid is not the sole cause of muscle fatigue during weightlifting, and current research suggests that it may actually be beneficial for muscle growth and adaptation. It can act as a fuel source for muscles and stimulate the release of growth factors that promote muscle repair and growth.

Ultimately, lactic acid is a natural byproduct of intense exercise, including weightlifting, and its presence can contribute to muscle fatigue and the burning sensation experienced during high-intensity workouts.


The big 3

The big 3, in both powerlifting and bodybuilding refers to squat, flat bench press, and deadlift.

I don't like these exercises as

Squat trains legs, which I feel is unnecessary

Flat bench press doesn't train the upper chest much, which is the important part for aesthetics, it should be replaced with incline bench press.

Deadlift is the worst lift in terms of its effort to hypertrophy ratio. It trains the posterior chain, mainly the spinal erectors and the glutes. It really only makes the back thicker, not wider, which is what is actually important for aesthetics.


No leg day?

The reason I didn't include a leg day in my routine was that legs aren't important for aesthetics. A v taper (wide shoulders and narrow waist) is preferable to a x taper (wide shoulders, narrow waist, and wide legs)


DIET

To begin, it would not be good for me to give everyone reading an exact diet to follow. That is why I will give general guidelines for making a diet.

The 2 most important things in a diet is

1. Your eating enough/not too much
2. Your getting in enough protein


I'll list good sources of each of the 3 macronutrients, you can pick a couple foods from each.

Protein:
Milk
Meat
Eggs
Peanut butter

Carbs:
Fruit
Non starchy vegetables (vegetables aside potatoes and corn)

Fat:
Fatty fish
Nuts
Avocados
Olive oil

Types of Macronutrients

We must understand there are 3 macronutrients that we need to consume to survive


1. Protein

This macro nutrient is used by the body to repair tissue, including muscle. It is made out of amino acids. Eat 1 gram of protein per lb of body weight (i.e if you weigh 200 lbs, eat 200 grams of protein).


2. Carbohydrates

This is the macronutrient that provides short term energy. It aids in recovery by replenishing glycogen stores. If you are cutting/ losing weight you should minimize how many carbohydrates you intake.


3. Fat

This is the macronutrient that provides long term energy. It's calorie dense in comparison to carbs or protein.



There are 2 types of fat,

Unsaturated fat
Considered healthy

Saturated fat
Unhealthy

Sources:
fatty meat
Chocolate
fried foods
ice cream

VITAMINS AND MINERALS

Vitamins and minerals are essential nutrients that the body needs in small amounts to function properly. They play vital roles in various physiological processes, including metabolism, immune function, and overall health.

Vitamins are organic compounds that are required in minute quantities and typically obtained through diet

Vitamins are classified into two categories: fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, and K) and water-soluble vitamins (B-complex vitamins and vitamin C). Fat-soluble vitamins are stored in the body's fatty tissues and liver and are best absorbed when consumed with dietary fats. Water-soluble vitamins dissolve in water and are not stored in the body, so they need to be consumed regularly through diet or supplementation.

Minerals are inorganic elements found in soil and water that are absorbed by plants and animals.

Minerals are categorized into two groups based on their required daily intake: macrominerals (such as calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, sodium, potassium, and chloride) and trace minerals (such as iron, zinc, copper, selenium, iodine, chromium, manganese, and molybdenum). Macrominerals are needed in larger amounts, while trace minerals are required in smaller quantities but are equally essential for various physiological functions.

Each vitamin and mineral plays specific roles in the body. For example, vitamin D is essential for calcium absorption and bone health, while vitamin C is crucial for collagen synthesis and immune function. Minerals like iron are necessary for oxygen transport in the blood, while potassium and sodium are electrolytes important for nerve function and fluid balance.

They are in general not that important for bodybuilding, more so for general health. If you eat a balanced diet eating all micronutrients you won't have to worry about it, however you can get a micronutrient if you are deficient.



SUPPLEMENTS
Here are some useful supplements you should take

1. Creatine Monohydrate:

• Enhances strength and power.

• Increases muscle mass.

• Boosts phosphocreatine levels for rapid energy production during intense exercise.

2. Fish Oil:

• Supports heart health by reducing inflammation and improving cholesterol levels.

• Enhances brain function and cognitive health.

• Promotes healthy skin and joints.

3. Magnesium:

• Supports muscle and nerve function.

• Aids in energy metabolism.

• Promotes bone health and regulates blood sugar levels.

4. Whey:

• Provides high-quality protein for muscle building and repair.

• Facilitates faster recovery after workouts.

• Convenient and easily absorbed protein source.

5. Multivitamin:

• Fills nutrient gaps in the diet.

• Supports overall health and well-being.

• Ensures adequate intake of essential vitamins and minerals for optimal functioning.


How to track how many calories you eat

1. Use a food scale to measure how much the food your eating weighs.
2. Use the app "MyFitnessPal" to log the food in and track how many calories your eating per day, get as close to your calorie goal as possible, to know how many calories to eat, see below.




Cutting and bulking


What is a BMR and a TDEE?

The amount of calories you burn by just existing is known as your Basal Metabolic rate, or BMR. Adding the amount of calories you burn by exercising and day to day activities, you get your TDEE (Total Daily Energy Expenditure).

BMR + Calories burnt thru exercising and day to day activities = TDEE

How to calculate TDEE?

https://www.health-calc.com/diet/energy-expenditure-advanced

What is caloric surplus/bulking?

Bulking is a caloric surplus, done in order to gain muscle mass. This will come with fat gain too, making it important to limit how much surplus you have. 500 is a good amount

What is a caloric deficit/cutting?

Cutting is a caloric deficit done in order to lose weight, however it will come with some muscle loss, making it important to eat more protein during a cut. 500 is a good deficit.

How long to do each?

You are mean to do each for at least 6 months, and then swap to the other one.

Which one should I do first as a beginner?

If your skinny fat (a fat belly with skinny arms), I would recommend bulking first.
If your fat fat, cut.
If your skinny, bulk


Accessories

Weightlifting gloves

Gloves used in lifting. Used to prevent calluses
Lifting straps

Straps used in pulling exercises, wouldn't recommend until your lifts are really heavy and you feel like you need them.

Knee wraps

Wraps around the knee, used to assist in squatting, can squat a bit more weight with these, wouldn't recommend, until your squats 300 lbs+

Lifting belt

Belt that goes around the waist, used to keep tension in the waist during deadlifts, squats, and overhead lifts. Wouldn't recommend until you go really heavy.

Gym bag

Bag you can put your stuff inside

Slingshot

Stuff t shirt to help you bench more. Wouldn't recommend until your bench is 300 lbs+

Weightlifting shoes

Shoes with a flat bottom used for lifting, provides a good base unlike shoes with cushiony bottoms which will inhibit your full strength on squat and deadlift.


Playlist
https://open.spotify.com/playlist/58MTHsky0b3UgUD5JLprgJ?si=wELAzQYZTJOompaZFnKJdg


Glossary

Rep - a repetition of an exercise
Barbell - a long bar you put plates on the end of
Dumbbell - a short bar with weights on the end
BB - Barbell
DB - Dumbbell
Dyel - Do you even lift?, referring to a person who lifts but doesn't look like they do.
Plate - Heavy circle you put on barbells
Calisthenics - Exercise using your own body



Useful Media/Links



Arnold Schwarzeneggers Encyclopedia of Modern Bodybuilding
https://archive.org/details/encyclopediaofmo00schw

How Heavy are the dumbbells you lift?

View attachment 2851867

Natural Hypertrophy
https://youtube.com/@NaturalHypertrophy?si=S0A7Pp-zSyQXJmbo

House of Hypertrophy
https://youtube.com/@HouseofHypertrophy?si=SHp5H1CdxA0e6C1X

4chan /fit/
https://boards.4chan.org/fit//

Bodybuilding.com Forum
https://shop.bodybuilding.com/


good thread but i would add legs on day 5
 
good thread but 80% is unnecessary.
if you want to gymcel, just go to the gym. have a good split, sleep well and eat good food. nothing more.
even lowest iq people can build a good physique.

Also you won't learn from the internet. if you are new to the gym, always go with someone or get a personal trainer. newbies don't know shit when reading things like 'incline bench' or 'progressive overload'.
yea I agree dude I had to teach my autistic brother everything bro and he looks at me like a retard saying “am I doing it right” he pisses me off so bad
 
i love the part where you train legs
1714471650871
 
  • WTF
Reactions: barettrealrx
1. Ideal Phsyqiue
2. Split
3. Routine
4. Progressive overload
4. Failure
5. Reps in reserve
6. Rep Ranges
7. Factors behind hypertrophy
8. Sport specific training
9. Hypertrophy vs hyperplasia
10. Lactic Acid/Fatigue
11. The big 3

12. No leg day?
13. Diet
14. Types of Macronutrients
15. Vitamins and minerals
16. Supplements
17. How to track calories
18.
Cutting and bulking
19. Accessories

20. Playlist
21. Glossary

22. Useful media, links

https://exrx.net/Lists/Directory
Refer to this for the exercises I list in the routines.


THE IDEAL PHSYIQUE

The ideal physique is shaped like the letter "V". The shoulder to waist ratio should be 1.6 or higher. It should be 15% body fat or less.

SPLIT

There are a bunch of training splits out there, however I will give my reasons for why most are inferior.

Bro split:
5 day split where each muscle group is allocated to it's own day (chest, back, shoulders, arms, legs)


It has insufficient frequency for each muscle group, studies have consistently shown that hitting a muscle group 2x a week will yield the most results.

PPL split:
6 day split that pairs the muscles that work together on their own training days, i.e the muscles that push, the muscles that pull, the leg muscles on their own days, repeating the cycle 2x a week.

This split is insufficient for growing the arms, as after the chest and back work you will be too fatigued to hit arms properly.


Upper/Lower Split:
This split divides workouts into upper body and lower body sessions. Upper body days typically focus on chest, back, shoulders, and arms, while lower body days target legs and core.


It has the same problem as the PPL split, that it doesn't sufficiently hit the arms, as you are too fatigued after the chest and back work to hit arms properly.



Full Body Split


A full-body split involves targeting all major muscle groups in one session,

This leads to fatigue that can compromise performance on the muscle groups exercises later in the session like arms and shoulders. This issue is similar to those in PPL and Upper-Lower splits but can be more pronounced due to hitting all muscles in a single session.


MY SPLIT


Day 1chest triceps shoulder
Day 2back biceps
Day 3
Day 4chest shoulders
Day 5back
Day 6biceps triceps
Day 7
Day 8


8 day split so you take 3 rest days every 8 days it's 5/4 days a week.

My Training
Day 1:
Incline bench press 3x6
Pec deck OR Cable flies 3x8
Lateral raises 4x10
pushdowns 3x10
Skullcrushers 3x8

Day 2:
Seated cable row OR t bar row 4x8
lat pulldown supinated 4x8
Alternating db curls 3x10
facepulls 3x8

Day 3:
rest or cardio or sport

Day 4:
Incline bench press 4x6
Pec deck OR cable flies 4x8
Upright row 3x10
Lateral raises 4x10

Day 5:
Seated Cable row OR T bar row 4x8
Lat pulldown pronated 4x8


Day 6:

Tricep pressdowns 3x10
EZ bar skullcrushers 3x10
Alternating DB curls 4x8
Preacher curls 4x8

Day 7:
rest or cardio or sport

Day 8:

rest or cardio or sport


Footnotes:
I would recommend going 1-2 RIR on each exercise.

Progressive Overload

Progressive overload is one of the main factors behind muscle growrth, and it is the idea that every workout session, you should go harder than last time on the exercise. There are 2 main ways to do this

1. Add an extra rep.
2. Add an extra 2.5/5 lbs


Failure

Failure in lifting is when you do reps to the point you cannot do anymore. There are 2 types of failure:

Absolute failure: doing reps until failure and then using techniques (like partials, assisted reps) to lift the weight until you can't even move the weight.

technical failure: doing reps to failure, and stopping at the point at which your technique/form becomes worse



Reps in reserve

Rreps in reserve, or commonly abbreviated to RIR, is how many reps you have until technical failure.


Rep Ranges

Rep refers to a repetition of an exercise. Rep range refers to the range of how many reps you do.

1-5 reps = strength training
6-12 reps = Muscle growth
13+ reps = endurance

Theoretically, the same muscle can be grown in all reps 5-30, however in the higher rep ranges, you will fatigue before reaching the level needed to see real muscle growth


Factors behind Hypertrophy

There are 3 main factors to what drives hypertrophy.

1
. Muscle Damage
2. Mechanical tension
3. Metabolic stress

Metabolic stress refers to the buildup of metabolites (such as lactic acid) , or what you feel as fatigue, within the muscle cells during exercise. This stress is believed to stimulate muscle growth by triggering the release of growth factors and promoting cellular adaptations.

Mechanical tension is the force exerted on the muscle fibers during resistance training, such as when lifting weights. This tension creates micro-tears in the muscle fibers, signaling the body to repair and strengthen them to better handle future stress.

Muscle damage occurs when the muscle fibers experience excessive strain or overload during exercise, leading to microscopic damage or tears in the muscle tissue. This damage triggers an inflammatory response and activates satellite cells, which are responsible for repairing and rebuilding the damaged muscle fibers, resulting in muscle growth and adaptation over time.

As the muscle adapts to the damage you are giving it, you must overload the muscle with either more reps or weight, meaning ultimately, progressive overload is the main factor behind hypertrophy, it being an adaptation to keep these 3 activating.


Sport specific Training

Not including pylometrics.


Day 1 - Upper Body Strength

1. Bench Press - 5 sets of 5 reps
2. Barbell Rows - 4 sets of 8 reps
3. Incline Dumbbell Press - 3 sets of 10 reps
4. Pull-ups - 3 sets to failure
5. Tricep Pushdowns - 3 sets of 12 reps

Day 2 - Lower Body Strength

1. Squats - 5 sets of 5 reps
2. Deadlifts - 4 sets of 8 reps
3. Lunges - 3 sets of 10 reps per leg
4. Leg Curls - 3 sets of 12 reps
5. Calf Raises - 3 sets of 15 reps

Day 3 - Rest

Day 4 - Upper Body Hypertrophy


1. Incline Bench Press - 4 sets of 12 reps
2. Bent Over Rows - 4 sets of 10 reps
3. Dumbbell Shoulder Press - 3 sets of 12 reps
4. Chin-ups - 3 sets to failure
5. Bicep Curls - 3 sets of 15 reps



Day 5 - Lower Body Hypertrophy
1. Front Squats - 4 sets of 12 reps
2. Romanian Deadlifts - 4 sets of 10 reps
3. Leg Press - 3 sets of 12 reps
4. Seated Leg Curls - 3 sets of 15 reps
5. Standing Calf Raises - 3 sets of 20 reps
Day 6 - Rest



Day 1: Full Body
Clean and jerk 3x5
Squat 3x5
Dumbbell bench press 3x10
Dumbbell row 3x10

Day 2: Full Body
Clean and hang 3x5
Situps 3x10

Day 3: Full Body
Clean and jerk 3x5
Squat 3x5
Dumbbell bench press 3x10
Dumbbell row 3x10

Hypertrophy vs Hyperplasia

Hypertrophy is the primary mechanism by which muscles grow in response to resistance training. When you lift weights, the muscle fibers experience stress and damage. In response to this stress, the muscle cells increase in size through the process of hypertrophy. This results in larger, stronger muscles.

Hyperplasia, on the other hand, is less common in the context of muscle growth. While some studies suggest that muscle hyperplasia may occur in response to extreme training stimuli, the predominant mechanism for muscle growth in bodybuilding is hypertrophy.

Therefore, in bodybuilding, the goal is typically to induce hypertrophy in the muscle fibers through resistance training, proper nutrition, and adequate recovery. This leads to an increase in muscle size and strength over time. Hyperplasia may play a role to a lesser extent, but hypertrophy is the main driver of muscle growth in bodybuilding.


Lactic Acid

Lactic acid, also known as lactate, is a byproduct of the process of glycolysis, which is the breakdown of glucose for energy during intense exercise. In the context of lifting weights, lactic acid is produced when the muscles are working hard and oxygen demand exceeds supply, leading to anaerobic metabolism.

When you lift weights, your muscles require energy to contract and perform the movements. If the intensity of the exercise is high or if you are performing a high number of repetitions, your body may not be able to deliver enough oxygen to the working muscles to meet their energy demands. In this case, the muscles switch to anaerobic metabolism, where glucose is broken down in the absence of oxygen to produce energy.

During anaerobic metabolism, lactic acid is produced as a byproduct. The accumulation of lactic acid in the muscle tissue can lead to the sensation of muscle fatigue, burning, and discomfort during high-intensity weightlifting sessions. This sensation is often referred to as the "burn" and is a result of the build-up of lactic acid in the muscles.

It is important to note that lactic acid is not the sole cause of muscle fatigue during weightlifting, and current research suggests that it may actually be beneficial for muscle growth and adaptation. It can act as a fuel source for muscles and stimulate the release of growth factors that promote muscle repair and growth.

Ultimately, lactic acid is a natural byproduct of intense exercise, including weightlifting, and its presence can contribute to muscle fatigue and the burning sensation experienced during high-intensity workouts.


The big 3

The big 3, in both powerlifting and bodybuilding refers to squat, flat bench press, and deadlift.

I don't like these exercises as

Squat trains legs, which I feel is unnecessary

Flat bench press doesn't train the upper chest much, which is the important part for aesthetics, it should be replaced with incline bench press.

Deadlift is the worst lift in terms of its effort to hypertrophy ratio. It trains the posterior chain, mainly the spinal erectors and the glutes. It really only makes the back thicker, not wider, which is what is actually important for aesthetics.


No leg day?

The reason I didn't include a leg day in my routine was that legs aren't important for aesthetics. A v taper (wide shoulders and narrow waist) is preferable to a x taper (wide shoulders, narrow waist, and wide legs)


DIET

To begin, it would not be good for me to give everyone reading an exact diet to follow. That is why I will give general guidelines for making a diet.

The 2 most important things in a diet is

1. Your eating enough/not too much
2. Your getting in enough protein


I'll list good sources of each of the 3 macronutrients, you can pick a couple foods from each.

Protein:
Milk
Meat
Eggs
Peanut butter

Carbs:
Fruit
Non starchy vegetables (vegetables aside potatoes and corn)

Fat:
Fatty fish
Nuts
Avocados
Olive oil

Types of Macronutrients

We must understand there are 3 macronutrients that we need to consume to survive


1. Protein

This macro nutrient is used by the body to repair tissue, including muscle. It is made out of amino acids. Eat 1 gram of protein per lb of body weight (i.e if you weigh 200 lbs, eat 200 grams of protein).


2. Carbohydrates

This is the macronutrient that provides short term energy. It aids in recovery by replenishing glycogen stores. If you are cutting/ losing weight you should minimize how many carbohydrates you intake.


3. Fat

This is the macronutrient that provides long term energy. It's calorie dense in comparison to carbs or protein.



There are 2 types of fat,

Unsaturated fat
Considered healthy

Saturated fat
Unhealthy

Sources:
fatty meat
Chocolate
fried foods
ice cream

VITAMINS AND MINERALS

Vitamins and minerals are essential nutrients that the body needs in small amounts to function properly. They play vital roles in various physiological processes, including metabolism, immune function, and overall health.

Vitamins are organic compounds that are required in minute quantities and typically obtained through diet

Vitamins are classified into two categories: fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, and K) and water-soluble vitamins (B-complex vitamins and vitamin C). Fat-soluble vitamins are stored in the body's fatty tissues and liver and are best absorbed when consumed with dietary fats. Water-soluble vitamins dissolve in water and are not stored in the body, so they need to be consumed regularly through diet or supplementation.

Minerals are inorganic elements found in soil and water that are absorbed by plants and animals.

Minerals are categorized into two groups based on their required daily intake: macrominerals (such as calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, sodium, potassium, and chloride) and trace minerals (such as iron, zinc, copper, selenium, iodine, chromium, manganese, and molybdenum). Macrominerals are needed in larger amounts, while trace minerals are required in smaller quantities but are equally essential for various physiological functions.

Each vitamin and mineral plays specific roles in the body. For example, vitamin D is essential for calcium absorption and bone health, while vitamin C is crucial for collagen synthesis and immune function. Minerals like iron are necessary for oxygen transport in the blood, while potassium and sodium are electrolytes important for nerve function and fluid balance.

They are in general not that important for bodybuilding, more so for general health. If you eat a balanced diet eating all micronutrients you won't have to worry about it, however you can get a micronutrient if you are deficient.



SUPPLEMENTS
Here are some useful supplements you should take

1. Creatine Monohydrate:

• Enhances strength and power.

• Increases muscle mass.

• Boosts phosphocreatine levels for rapid energy production during intense exercise.

2. Fish Oil:

• Supports heart health by reducing inflammation and improving cholesterol levels.

• Enhances brain function and cognitive health.

• Promotes healthy skin and joints.

3. Magnesium:

• Supports muscle and nerve function.

• Aids in energy metabolism.

• Promotes bone health and regulates blood sugar levels.

4. Whey:

• Provides high-quality protein for muscle building and repair.

• Facilitates faster recovery after workouts.

• Convenient and easily absorbed protein source.

5. Multivitamin:

• Fills nutrient gaps in the diet.

• Supports overall health and well-being.

• Ensures adequate intake of essential vitamins and minerals for optimal functioning.


How to track how many calories you eat

1. Use a food scale to measure how much the food your eating weighs.
2. Use the app "MyFitnessPal" to log the food in and track how many calories your eating per day, get as close to your calorie goal as possible, to know how many calories to eat, see below.




Cutting and bulking


What is a BMR and a TDEE?

The amount of calories you burn by just existing is known as your Basal Metabolic rate, or BMR. Adding the amount of calories you burn by exercising and day to day activities, you get your TDEE (Total Daily Energy Expenditure).

BMR + Calories burnt thru exercising and day to day activities = TDEE

How to calculate TDEE?

https://www.health-calc.com/diet/energy-expenditure-advanced

What is caloric surplus/bulking?

Bulking is a caloric surplus, done in order to gain muscle mass. This will come with fat gain too, making it important to limit how much surplus you have. 500 is a good amount

What is a caloric deficit/cutting?

Cutting is a caloric deficit done in order to lose weight, however it will come with some muscle loss, making it important to eat more protein during a cut. 500 is a good deficit.

How long to do each?

You are mean to do each for at least 6 months, and then swap to the other one.

Which one should I do first as a beginner?

If your skinny fat (a fat belly with skinny arms), I would recommend bulking first.
If your fat fat, cut.
If your skinny, bulk


Accessories

Weightlifting gloves

Gloves used in lifting. Used to prevent calluses
Lifting straps

Straps used in pulling exercises, wouldn't recommend until your lifts are really heavy and you feel like you need them.

Knee wraps

Wraps around the knee, used to assist in squatting, can squat a bit more weight with these, wouldn't recommend, until your squats 300 lbs+

Lifting belt

Belt that goes around the waist, used to keep tension in the waist during deadlifts, squats, and overhead lifts. Wouldn't recommend until you go really heavy.

Gym bag

Bag you can put your stuff inside

Slingshot

Stuff t shirt to help you bench more. Wouldn't recommend until your bench is 300 lbs+

Weightlifting shoes

Shoes with a flat bottom used for lifting, provides a good base unlike shoes with cushiony bottoms which will inhibit your full strength on squat and deadlift.


Playlist
https://open.spotify.com/playlist/58MTHsky0b3UgUD5JLprgJ?si=wELAzQYZTJOompaZFnKJdg


Glossary

Rep - a repetition of an exercise
Barbell - a long bar you put plates on the end of
Dumbbell - a short bar with weights on the end
BB - Barbell
DB - Dumbbell
Dyel - Do you even lift?, referring to a person who lifts but doesn't look like they do.
Plate - Heavy circle you put on barbells
Calisthenics - Exercise using your own body



Useful Media/Links



Arnold Schwarzeneggers Encyclopedia of Modern Bodybuilding
https://archive.org/details/encyclopediaofmo00schw

How Heavy are the dumbbells you lift?

View attachment 2851867

Natural Hypertrophy
https://youtube.com/@NaturalHypertrophy?si=S0A7Pp-zSyQXJmbo

House of Hypertrophy
https://youtube.com/@HouseofHypertrophy?si=SHp5H1CdxA0e6C1X

4chan /fit/
https://boards.4chan.org/fit//

Bodybuilding.com Forum
https://shop.bodybuilding.com/


I wouldn't suggest this thread to everyone. I respect the efforts but many of these are misinterpreted or misled.
 
  • So Sad
Reactions: barettrealrx
This split is insufficient for growing the arms, as after the chest and back work you will be too fatigued to hit arms properly.
The arms are still being hit efficient on a PPL. Each P has a part of the arm being worked. Push = triceps and Pull = biceps/forearms

And the compound exercises for each (like a bench press or pull-up/barbell row) still hit the corresponding part of the arm very efficiently.
 
  • WTF
Reactions: barettrealrx
good thread
 
  • Love it
Reactions: barettrealrx
dnr a molecule but mirin the efforts bro bump
 
1. Ideal Phsyqiue
2. Split
3. Routine
4. Progressive overload
4. Failure
5. Reps in reserve
6. Rep Ranges
7. Factors behind hypertrophy
8. Sport specific training
9. Hypertrophy vs hyperplasia
10. Lactic Acid/Fatigue
11. The big 3

12. No leg day?
13. Diet
14. Types of Macronutrients
15. Vitamins and minerals
16. Supplements
17. How to track calories
18.
Cutting and bulking
19. Accessories

20. Playlist
21. Glossary

22. Useful media, links

https://exrx.net/Lists/Directory
Refer to this for the exercises I list in the routines.


THE IDEAL PHSYIQUE

The ideal physique is shaped like the letter "V". The shoulder to waist ratio should be 1.6 or higher. It should be 15% body fat or less.

SPLIT

There are a bunch of training splits out there, however I will give my reasons for why most are inferior.

Bro split:
5 day split where each muscle group is allocated to it's own day (chest, back, shoulders, arms, legs)


It has insufficient frequency for each muscle group, studies have consistently shown that hitting a muscle group 2x a week will yield the most results.

PPL split:
6 day split that pairs the muscles that work together on their own training days, i.e the muscles that push, the muscles that pull, the leg muscles on their own days, repeating the cycle 2x a week.

This split is insufficient for growing the arms, as after the chest and back work you will be too fatigued to hit arms properly.


Upper/Lower Split:
This split divides workouts into upper body and lower body sessions. Upper body days typically focus on chest, back, shoulders, and arms, while lower body days target legs and core.


It has the same problem as the PPL split, that it doesn't sufficiently hit the arms, as you are too fatigued after the chest and back work to hit arms properly.



Full Body Split


A full-body split involves targeting all major muscle groups in one session,

This leads to fatigue that can compromise performance on the muscle groups exercises later in the session like arms and shoulders. This issue is similar to those in PPL and Upper-Lower splits but can be more pronounced due to hitting all muscles in a single session.


MY SPLIT


Day 1chest triceps shoulder
Day 2back biceps
Day 3
Day 4chest shoulders
Day 5back
Day 6biceps triceps
Day 7
Day 8


8 day split so you take 3 rest days every 8 days it's 5/4 days a week.

My Training
Day 1:
Incline bench press 3x6
Pec deck OR Cable flies 3x8
Lateral raises 4x10
pushdowns 3x10
Skullcrushers 3x8

Day 2:
Seated cable row OR t bar row 4x8
lat pulldown supinated 4x8
Alternating db curls 3x10
facepulls 3x8

Day 3:
rest or cardio or sport

Day 4:
Incline bench press 4x6
Pec deck OR cable flies 4x8
Upright row 3x10
Lateral raises 4x10

Day 5:
Seated Cable row OR T bar row 4x8
Lat pulldown pronated 4x8


Day 6:

Tricep pressdowns 3x10
EZ bar skullcrushers 3x10
Alternating DB curls 4x8
Preacher curls 4x8

Day 7:
rest or cardio or sport

Day 8:

rest or cardio or sport


Footnotes:
I would recommend going 1-2 RIR on each exercise.

Progressive Overload

Progressive overload is one of the main factors behind muscle growrth, and it is the idea that every workout session, you should go harder than last time on the exercise. There are 2 main ways to do this

1. Add an extra rep.
2. Add an extra 2.5/5 lbs


Failure

Failure in lifting is when you do reps to the point you cannot do anymore. There are 2 types of failure:

Absolute failure: doing reps until failure and then using techniques (like partials, assisted reps) to lift the weight until you can't even move the weight.

technical failure: doing reps to failure, and stopping at the point at which your technique/form becomes worse



Reps in reserve

Rreps in reserve, or commonly abbreviated to RIR, is how many reps you have until technical failure.


Rep Ranges

Rep refers to a repetition of an exercise. Rep range refers to the range of how many reps you do.

1-5 reps = strength training
6-12 reps = Muscle growth
13+ reps = endurance

Theoretically, the same muscle can be grown in all reps 5-30, however in the higher rep ranges, you will fatigue before reaching the level needed to see real muscle growth


Factors behind Hypertrophy

There are 3 main factors to what drives hypertrophy.

1
. Muscle Damage
2. Mechanical tension
3. Metabolic stress

Metabolic stress refers to the buildup of metabolites (such as lactic acid) , or what you feel as fatigue, within the muscle cells during exercise. This stress is believed to stimulate muscle growth by triggering the release of growth factors and promoting cellular adaptations.

Mechanical tension is the force exerted on the muscle fibers during resistance training, such as when lifting weights. This tension creates micro-tears in the muscle fibers, signaling the body to repair and strengthen them to better handle future stress.

Muscle damage occurs when the muscle fibers experience excessive strain or overload during exercise, leading to microscopic damage or tears in the muscle tissue. This damage triggers an inflammatory response and activates satellite cells, which are responsible for repairing and rebuilding the damaged muscle fibers, resulting in muscle growth and adaptation over time.

As the muscle adapts to the damage you are giving it, you must overload the muscle with either more reps or weight, meaning ultimately, progressive overload is the main factor behind hypertrophy, it being an adaptation to keep these 3 activating.


Sport specific Training

Not including pylometrics.


Day 1 - Upper Body Strength

1. Bench Press - 5 sets of 5 reps
2. Barbell Rows - 4 sets of 8 reps
3. Incline Dumbbell Press - 3 sets of 10 reps
4. Pull-ups - 3 sets to failure
5. Tricep Pushdowns - 3 sets of 12 reps

Day 2 - Lower Body Strength

1. Squats - 5 sets of 5 reps
2. Deadlifts - 4 sets of 8 reps
3. Lunges - 3 sets of 10 reps per leg
4. Leg Curls - 3 sets of 12 reps
5. Calf Raises - 3 sets of 15 reps

Day 3 - Rest

Day 4 - Upper Body Hypertrophy


1. Incline Bench Press - 4 sets of 12 reps
2. Bent Over Rows - 4 sets of 10 reps
3. Dumbbell Shoulder Press - 3 sets of 12 reps
4. Chin-ups - 3 sets to failure
5. Bicep Curls - 3 sets of 15 reps



Day 5 - Lower Body Hypertrophy
1. Front Squats - 4 sets of 12 reps
2. Romanian Deadlifts - 4 sets of 10 reps
3. Leg Press - 3 sets of 12 reps
4. Seated Leg Curls - 3 sets of 15 reps
5. Standing Calf Raises - 3 sets of 20 reps
Day 6 - Rest



Day 1: Full Body
Clean and jerk 3x5
Squat 3x5
Dumbbell bench press 3x10
Dumbbell row 3x10

Day 2: Full Body
Clean and hang 3x5
Situps 3x10

Day 3: Full Body
Clean and jerk 3x5
Squat 3x5
Dumbbell bench press 3x10
Dumbbell row 3x10

Hypertrophy vs Hyperplasia

Hypertrophy is the primary mechanism by which muscles grow in response to resistance training. When you lift weights, the muscle fibers experience stress and damage. In response to this stress, the muscle cells increase in size through the process of hypertrophy. This results in larger, stronger muscles.

Hyperplasia, on the other hand, is less common in the context of muscle growth. While some studies suggest that muscle hyperplasia may occur in response to extreme training stimuli, the predominant mechanism for muscle growth in bodybuilding is hypertrophy.

Therefore, in bodybuilding, the goal is typically to induce hypertrophy in the muscle fibers through resistance training, proper nutrition, and adequate recovery. This leads to an increase in muscle size and strength over time. Hyperplasia may play a role to a lesser extent, but hypertrophy is the main driver of muscle growth in bodybuilding.


Lactic Acid

Lactic acid, also known as lactate, is a byproduct of the process of glycolysis, which is the breakdown of glucose for energy during intense exercise. In the context of lifting weights, lactic acid is produced when the muscles are working hard and oxygen demand exceeds supply, leading to anaerobic metabolism.

When you lift weights, your muscles require energy to contract and perform the movements. If the intensity of the exercise is high or if you are performing a high number of repetitions, your body may not be able to deliver enough oxygen to the working muscles to meet their energy demands. In this case, the muscles switch to anaerobic metabolism, where glucose is broken down in the absence of oxygen to produce energy.

During anaerobic metabolism, lactic acid is produced as a byproduct. The accumulation of lactic acid in the muscle tissue can lead to the sensation of muscle fatigue, burning, and discomfort during high-intensity weightlifting sessions. This sensation is often referred to as the "burn" and is a result of the build-up of lactic acid in the muscles.

It is important to note that lactic acid is not the sole cause of muscle fatigue during weightlifting, and current research suggests that it may actually be beneficial for muscle growth and adaptation. It can act as a fuel source for muscles and stimulate the release of growth factors that promote muscle repair and growth.

Ultimately, lactic acid is a natural byproduct of intense exercise, including weightlifting, and its presence can contribute to muscle fatigue and the burning sensation experienced during high-intensity workouts.


The big 3

The big 3, in both powerlifting and bodybuilding refers to squat, flat bench press, and deadlift.

I don't like these exercises as

Squat trains legs, which I feel is unnecessary

Flat bench press doesn't train the upper chest much, which is the important part for aesthetics, it should be replaced with incline bench press.

Deadlift is the worst lift in terms of its effort to hypertrophy ratio. It trains the posterior chain, mainly the spinal erectors and the glutes. It really only makes the back thicker, not wider, which is what is actually important for aesthetics.


No leg day?

The reason I didn't include a leg day in my routine was that legs aren't important for aesthetics. A v taper (wide shoulders and narrow waist) is preferable to a x taper (wide shoulders, narrow waist, and wide legs)


DIET

To begin, it would not be good for me to give everyone reading an exact diet to follow. That is why I will give general guidelines for making a diet.

The 2 most important things in a diet is

1. Your eating enough/not too much
2. Your getting in enough protein


I'll list good sources of each of the 3 macronutrients, you can pick a couple foods from each.

Protein:
Milk
Meat
Eggs
Peanut butter

Carbs:
Fruit
Non starchy vegetables (vegetables aside potatoes and corn)

Fat:
Fatty fish
Nuts
Avocados
Olive oil

Types of Macronutrients

We must understand there are 3 macronutrients that we need to consume to survive


1. Protein

This macro nutrient is used by the body to repair tissue, including muscle. It is made out of amino acids. Eat 1 gram of protein per lb of body weight (i.e if you weigh 200 lbs, eat 200 grams of protein).


2. Carbohydrates

This is the macronutrient that provides short term energy. It aids in recovery by replenishing glycogen stores. If you are cutting/ losing weight you should minimize how many carbohydrates you intake.


3. Fat

This is the macronutrient that provides long term energy. It's calorie dense in comparison to carbs or protein.



There are 2 types of fat,

Unsaturated fat
Considered healthy

Saturated fat
Unhealthy

Sources:
fatty meat
Chocolate
fried foods
ice cream

VITAMINS AND MINERALS

Vitamins and minerals are essential nutrients that the body needs in small amounts to function properly. They play vital roles in various physiological processes, including metabolism, immune function, and overall health.

Vitamins are organic compounds that are required in minute quantities and typically obtained through diet

Vitamins are classified into two categories: fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, and K) and water-soluble vitamins (B-complex vitamins and vitamin C). Fat-soluble vitamins are stored in the body's fatty tissues and liver and are best absorbed when consumed with dietary fats. Water-soluble vitamins dissolve in water and are not stored in the body, so they need to be consumed regularly through diet or supplementation.

Minerals are inorganic elements found in soil and water that are absorbed by plants and animals.

Minerals are categorized into two groups based on their required daily intake: macrominerals (such as calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, sodium, potassium, and chloride) and trace minerals (such as iron, zinc, copper, selenium, iodine, chromium, manganese, and molybdenum). Macrominerals are needed in larger amounts, while trace minerals are required in smaller quantities but are equally essential for various physiological functions.

Each vitamin and mineral plays specific roles in the body. For example, vitamin D is essential for calcium absorption and bone health, while vitamin C is crucial for collagen synthesis and immune function. Minerals like iron are necessary for oxygen transport in the blood, while potassium and sodium are electrolytes important for nerve function and fluid balance.

They are in general not that important for bodybuilding, more so for general health. If you eat a balanced diet eating all micronutrients you won't have to worry about it, however you can get a micronutrient if you are deficient.



SUPPLEMENTS
Here are some useful supplements you should take

1. Creatine Monohydrate:

• Enhances strength and power.

• Increases muscle mass.

• Boosts phosphocreatine levels for rapid energy production during intense exercise.

2. Fish Oil:

• Supports heart health by reducing inflammation and improving cholesterol levels.

• Enhances brain function and cognitive health.

• Promotes healthy skin and joints.

3. Magnesium:

• Supports muscle and nerve function.

• Aids in energy metabolism.

• Promotes bone health and regulates blood sugar levels.

4. Whey:

• Provides high-quality protein for muscle building and repair.

• Facilitates faster recovery after workouts.

• Convenient and easily absorbed protein source.

5. Multivitamin:

• Fills nutrient gaps in the diet.

• Supports overall health and well-being.

• Ensures adequate intake of essential vitamins and minerals for optimal functioning.


How to track how many calories you eat

1. Use a food scale to measure how much the food your eating weighs.
2. Use the app "MyFitnessPal" to log the food in and track how many calories your eating per day, get as close to your calorie goal as possible, to know how many calories to eat, see below.




Cutting and bulking


What is a BMR and a TDEE?

The amount of calories you burn by just existing is known as your Basal Metabolic rate, or BMR. Adding the amount of calories you burn by exercising and day to day activities, you get your TDEE (Total Daily Energy Expenditure).

BMR + Calories burnt thru exercising and day to day activities = TDEE

How to calculate TDEE?

https://www.health-calc.com/diet/energy-expenditure-advanced

What is caloric surplus/bulking?

Bulking is a caloric surplus, done in order to gain muscle mass. This will come with fat gain too, making it important to limit how much surplus you have. 500 is a good amount

What is a caloric deficit/cutting?

Cutting is a caloric deficit done in order to lose weight, however it will come with some muscle loss, making it important to eat more protein during a cut. 500 is a good deficit.

How long to do each?

You are mean to do each for at least 6 months, and then swap to the other one.

Which one should I do first as a beginner?

If your skinny fat (a fat belly with skinny arms), I would recommend bulking first.
If your fat fat, cut.
If your skinny, bulk


Accessories

Weightlifting gloves

Gloves used in lifting. Used to prevent calluses
Lifting straps

Straps used in pulling exercises, wouldn't recommend until your lifts are really heavy and you feel like you need them.

Knee wraps

Wraps around the knee, used to assist in squatting, can squat a bit more weight with these, wouldn't recommend, until your squats 300 lbs+

Lifting belt

Belt that goes around the waist, used to keep tension in the waist during deadlifts, squats, and overhead lifts. Wouldn't recommend until you go really heavy.

Gym bag

Bag you can put your stuff inside

Slingshot

Stuff t shirt to help you bench more. Wouldn't recommend until your bench is 300 lbs+

Weightlifting shoes

Shoes with a flat bottom used for lifting, provides a good base unlike shoes with cushiony bottoms which will inhibit your full strength on squat and deadlift.


Playlist
https://open.spotify.com/playlist/58MTHsky0b3UgUD5JLprgJ?si=wELAzQYZTJOompaZFnKJdg


Glossary

Rep - a repetition of an exercise
Barbell - a long bar you put plates on the end of
Dumbbell - a short bar with weights on the end
BB - Barbell
DB - Dumbbell
Dyel - Do you even lift?, referring to a person who lifts but doesn't look like they do.
Plate - Heavy circle you put on barbells
Calisthenics - Exercise using your own body



Useful Media/Links



Arnold Schwarzeneggers Encyclopedia of Modern Bodybuilding
https://archive.org/details/encyclopediaofmo00schw

How Heavy are the dumbbells you lift?

View attachment 2851867

Natural Hypertrophy
https://youtube.com/@NaturalHypertrophy?si=S0A7Pp-zSyQXJmbo

House of Hypertrophy
https://youtube.com/@HouseofHypertrophy?si=SHp5H1CdxA0e6C1X

4chan /fit/
https://boards.4chan.org/fit//

Bodybuilding.com Forum
https://shop.bodybuilding.com/


good thread, why do u not train flat bench, also what ur physique look like bro
 

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