Temporal peaks are crucial for aesthetics and often completely ignored

NegativeNorwood

NegativeNorwood

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"Temporal peaks usually can make a hairline look much lower or higher than it actually is, just by their positioning - more frontal (shortening the distance between each contralateral peak) or more posterior (increasing their distance). We can rapidly infer from this that the closer they’re together, the smaller the forehead looks and the wider they’re positioned, the opposite occurs."

brad-pitt-leonardo-dicaprio-lko-002038-big.jpg


We can see this pretty clearly if we look at Leonardo DiCaprio and Brad Pitt. This was actually pointed out to me by Dr. Jose Lorenzo when we were discussing hairlines and temporal peaks."

Note how despite being a hair transplant surgeon, who should know this better than his own name, this was pointed to him by another doctor (!).

Browsing the web we can see that the bluepill reigns supreme with most hair transplant surgeons, this is a response by one:


"Dear Jacob_93, Thank you for posting this question. You’re quite observant. It’s true: overly low or full temporal recessions (where the hairline meets ends on each side of the hairline) are a common sign of a hair transplant procedure. Why is this? Because it’s a subtle aspect of the artistry of hair restoration, and many doctors who are less experienced are not aware of many of the hundreds of the aesthetic decision making that goes into hair transplant surgery. The truth is that many patients will ask for *more* hair in these areas, and to make their patients happy, the less-experienced hair transplant surgeon will oblige, and “fill up the corners” as my patients often say. It’s intuitive that hair in the corners looks more youthful. However, it’s important to remember that not everyone can pull off that look. Full corners are more suitable for more round faces, African American faces, and some other cultures where the hairline is naturally rather straight across. You appear to be a Caucasian man, and you would look definitely odd with temporal recessions that were aggressively filled in. It’s a sign of having been “done” in this industry. As the old adage goes, “the good thing about the results of a hair transplant surgery is that they are permanent; the bad thing is that they are permanent.” As men of Caucasian descent tend to have oval faces, being conservative in the temporal recessions is key. Many Caucasian men *start* to lose hair in this very area. If it is overly-done, and too aggressive, then as more hair loss occurs in the future, it can look incongruous. You’re only 32. You could develop crown loss at age 40. Then by 45 you might have a tennis-ball sized spot in the crown. Achieving 100% total crown coverage with hair restoration surgery is difficult, and occasionally impossible due to intrinsic factors of the patient (eg: hair shaft diameters, hair color vs scalp color, etc.) So, suppose you’re going to have a surgery to cover the bald spot when you’re 45...so you will have some coverage, but it will be evident that there’s a light area and you have some hair loss in the crown. However, if your temporal recessions have been 100% corrected, and there’s no loss there, that usually looks unusual in a Caucasian man. So, it’s often best to tread lightly in the temporal recessions as the newly constructed hairline must literally be timeless in nature. It has to look natural when you’re 32, and when you’re 82. I hope this information is helpful to you. Kind Regards, Ken Anderson, MD, FISHRS"

The coping and gaslighting is too much. Jfl at the round face ethnic teenager cope, let's take a look at some white men over 30 years old with prominent temporal peaks, edited to have the "age coherent perfect hairline" with less prominent temples that this man thinks is ideal:

2179173_999.jpg


He may have a point in the sense of covering more balding areas in the future, but he is wrong with regards to aesthetics.
This is a great morph by Feriduni, it's Brad Pitt (old caucasian man with age incoherent hairline, like that doctor would say) with recessed temples on side profile. Left original, right morphed.
Celebrity4-voor-28b7b693.jpeg
Celebrity4-na-6b95a7fe.jpeg


Big descension, looks much worse with less prominent temples.

Tyson Ballou (another old caucasian man with age incoherent hairline) edit found here
2183648_3A17EC3F-3BAF-4AF6-9B75-45AEB2DC2BF0.jpeg
2183676_1608751606758.png


BIG descension too.

The only thing that I see that is common for white people with that kind of temple prominence is that they have an ideal forehead slope, not vertical but close to it.

Tyson+Ballou+12.jpg
3997562207_5e03973e9a_n.jpg


It think that kind of almost straight forehead is needed to the temporal peaks to look natural (and not the bs of round face teenager non caucasian guy said by that doctor).

Basically, find a blackpilled surgeon and have a forehead like that (or a custom forehead implant before the hair transplant if yours is too sloped).
Most hair transplant surgeons seem to don't know shit about what makes a face good looking from what I've read.

This clearly blackpilled, high IQ man had a hair transplant with the goal of having a Brad Pitt/Tyson Ballou type hairline, with very prominent temples. Could he have a much better face and be leaner? Yes. Does he look way better than before with his recessed temples? Yes.

Final result


Copy/pasting last video's description

"The temporal peak is a luxury necessity in hair restoration and is a point of definition and individuality. Temporal peaks frame a face and produce symmetry by the effect eyebrow contouring. It is the third component in a triple layer framing effect; the eyelashes contour the eyes, which are contoured by the eyebrows, contoured by the temporal peaks - a rarely discussed concept (Lawlor K, 2021).

They have a drastic effect on the perception of facial proportions and produce a point of focality that the eye is drawn to. Loss of temporal peaks produce a larger face, that can look "balding" and less attractive. With loss of this vertical framing, increased facial width becomes visually unaesthetic as youthful aesthetic ratios are absent, and facial fat becomes perceived as overweight/bloating.
In opposition, bringing in the temporal peaks improves ratios and enhances all facial components by creating a narrower field of view via a closer frame. This effect draws the viewer's eye inwards when looking at the face - lips, eyes, brows and forehead become exaggerated, which is perceived as more youthful. In essence, temporal peaks create physical identity and closely associate with youth.

Coronal sites produce the flattest angles and are best suited for temporal peak design to mimic nature as close as possible. As an implanted graft heals and scarring occurs around it, it actually rises several degrees upwards from the original angle implanted. This is why having the graft as perpendicular as possible is key to a natural outcome when healed. Sagittal sites are often used on by others in this field for temporal peak design, producing a design where hair exits the skin at a higher angle, sticking out in a way that does not occur in nature.
This is why temporal peaks are often botched, yielding an unnatural appearance that does not enhance the aesthetic profile - in fact it draws attention to something "off" in the person. Temporal peaks are, unequivocally, the most advanced area in hair restoration surgery. Simply put, they will either enhance or disfigure a person - there is no middle ground. "


Shutterstock_5068968cz.jpg
rs_634x1024-131218110518-634.brad-pitt-04.cm.121813.jpg
123c2b708405d6c94ae33e2ef285ae95.jpg
f73fe17fdf229ef85da19693bee69484.jpg


That kind of hairline with prominent temples is one of the key aspects to look good with a buzzcut or pull any hairstyle. Both buzzcut and curtains look equally good on both. I'm starting to think that this is what women refer to as "effortlessly beautiful", someone that looks good no matter what...basically, brutal upper third pill. Does someone look good just with a certain hairstyle despite top tier features in general? 100% sure subpar hairline and/or forehead.

And then some hair transplant surgeons, who should know this better than their own names, have the audacity to say that a Norwood 1.5-2 hairline with receding temples is ideal for men...unbelievable.

PS. this is all I know about hairlines, I'm not an expert. Please don't dm me for hair advice, use the forum's search function or contact an expert instead.
 
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Good thread. Isn't TPs the first spots one loses their hair from androgens?
 
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there are a million threads about it already.

The thing is that no one will waste precious graphs on something that is at the bottom of importance
 
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Good thread. Isn't TPs the first spots one loses their hair from androgens?

Thanks! Yes.


Your avi forgot to order the temporal points to his doctor, that's quite funny isn't it?

there are a million threads about it already.

The thing is that no one will waste precious graphs on something that is at the bottom of importance

There are very few threads about it.
Clearly a very important feature, you are either dumb or coping.
 
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Excellent thread, I've been thinking about it as well, temples are very important for overall upperthird harmony. This is why hairstyles with skinfade and too high temple fades look extremely retarded.
 
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Your avi forgot to order the temporal points to his doctor, that's quite funny isn't it?
When I saw Thurston HT results I was like wtf he got scammed. Just disappointing after.

You seem somewhat knowledgeable why didn't you reply - I tagged you at the hips megathread.
 
When I saw Thurston HT results I was like wtf he got scammed.

You seem somewhat knowledgeable why didn't you reply - I tagged you at the hips megathread.

His ht could have been much better, that's true.
Sorry, didn't see the tag. Also don't know shit about hips so I doubt I could be helpful either.
 
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There are very few threads about it.
Clearly a very important feature, you are either dumb or coping.
yeah, so important that there are a GL men without it. but idc. that wasn't the point of my post

the point was go ahead and slap HT grafts there when in the future you will need them on the top your head balding
 
I need this
 
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another day another failo :feelswhy:
 
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there are a million threads about it already.

The thing is that no one will waste precious graphs on something that is at the bottom of importance
Not a good take Rupert.
 
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I’m actually potentially going to be getting a ht specifically on my temple points. I’ve never had dense or noticeable temple points even as a kid it was lightly blonde. No one In my family loses hair, so Dr bloxham out of nyc might help me out. Here’s my 25 year old hairline (widows peak and flat temple peaks always been this way — don’t tell me I’m losing hair because I always have the thickest hair according to the barber) will also post a pic of 55 yo dads hair and 50+ year old moms brothers hair as reference to my family genetics.
Me:
B59C60C0 0A11 4E32 9AED F9AAD5FF5C15

Moms bro:
9CA75CE1 620E 4D96 85DE 6AEEA8B17E09
Dad:
881E76F9 B8FD 48A3 8F0B 96E4957B2B91
 

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I’m actually potentially going to be getting a ht specifically on my temple points. I’ve never had dense or noticeable temple points even as a kid it was lightly blonde. No one In my family loses hair, so Dr bloxham out of nyc might help me out. Here’s my 25 year old hairline (widows peak and flat temple peaks always been this way — don’t tell me I’m losing hair because I always have the thickest hair according to the barber) will also post a pic of 55 yo dads hair and 50+ year old moms brothers hair as reference to my family genetics.
Me:
View attachment 1879676
Moms bro:
View attachment 1879674
Dad:
View attachment 1879673

My case is very similar, I never had very noticeable temple points. They receded a bit and hairline became V shaped at 25, but still look the same currently at 30 yo. I also have a very sloped forehead, and plan to have a custom forehead implant to reduce the slope before the hair transplant.
Please keep us updated, transplant specifically on the temples with aesthetics in mind is something rarely seen and barely discussed.
 
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My case is very similar, I never had very noticeable temple points. They receded a bit and hairline became V shaped at 25, but still look the same currently at 30 yo. I also have a very sloped forehead, and plan to have a custom forehead implant to reduce the slope before the hair transplant.
Please keep us updated, transplant specifically on the temples with aesthetics in mind is something rarely seen and barely discussed.
This is my forehead. Think it’s ideal for masculinity. The only other guy I see with a similar forehead is Jason momoa. I wonder if it’s due to Neanderthal DNA?
D3DF4159 183F 4FBF AEAC EA78A4F380D7 5F6825E1 1352 4C8C 9F4F 797C5DEB8588
His eyebrow density mogs mine obviously.
 
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This is my forehead. Think it’s ideal for masculinity. The only other guy I see with a similar forehead is Jason momoa. I wonder if it’s due to Neanderthal DNA?
View attachment 1880312View attachment 1880318
His eyebrow density mogs mine obviously.

Hard to tell because your pic is more a 3/4 view than a side profile, but you seem to have an overly protrusive browridge more than an overly sloped forehead. Momoa has both. I'm not a fan of the look, but is better than a rounded forehead like ie Aaron Paul.


Ideal browridge is less prominent but sharper, low set, and the forehead slope must be less than the nose. If the forehead is so sloped that it follows the same angle as the nasal bridge, it's not aesthetic.

This is ideal
ad5fb8e3f6b6f48aee507bae1c7b8f20.jpg
hossein-diba-45.jpg
large-1533220106-7786118ede294e0298798f06ee886bc6.jpg
Baptiste giabiconi side profile


Ct scan side 2
Forehead


That's my CT scan in addition to a pic of my forehead without covering it with the curtains haircut, I have a big browridge (but not as much as yours) with a very sloped forehead (and receding temples) coupled to a low nose bridge (for which I'll also get a rhino, to resemble more the side profiles noses above in terms of nose bridge height).

I understand Jason Momoa's appeal to women but I don't strive to look like that, the examples above have more conventionally attractive/aesthetic upper thirds. It's true such a big browridge and sloped forehead is masculine and neanderthal-ish, and way better tha a forehead like Aaron Paul's, but not ideal IMO.
 
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just doodled a quick outline of what my hairline could look like. Don't have the $10k usd needed for it right now however D: Hairline
 
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lifefuel for my temples
 
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Nice to see an original thread for once.

The Mexican barbers in my area always want to shave these off for some reason. I think it's part of the fade look that they like to go for. I always though it looks worse with those shaved (and looks awkward when the hair is regrowing as well).
 
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Hhhhfhtg


You mirin temporal peaks?
 
Certainly, it's the reason why most of my haircuts look dull or subpar. I'll likely get a hair transplant in the region within the next two years.
 
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Updating this legendary thread with relevant info.
(time stamped at 20:38)

540948380_image(10).jpg.81c4db4bffeb62bad08c315ec342835c.jpg


Elite hair transplant surgeon Felipe Pittella said he designs the temples taking into account the patient's face (which all surgeons say but don't explain in detail). He drew a line following the temple design and another one following the nose, which was used as a reference to design them. Rhinoplasty example:

Asian rhino 1


If he were balding and needed a transplant to the temples, the optimal design will be different with his new nose.

Basically, if you plan getting a rhinoplasty and a hair transplant, do the rhinoplasty before, so the new temples follow your post rhinoplasty nose for maximum aesthetics.
Same if you want to get a custom implant to straighten a sloped forehead, get it before so the new temples match the new forehead better and the scar can be covered with some grafts if you want it.

Hair transplant = always the last surgery for best harmony
 
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I'd like to add this to the botb, but i am uncertain because it doesn't have headers/table of contents, so it makes it harder to read
 
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I'd like to add this to the botb, but i am uncertain because it doesn't have headers/table of contents, so it makes it harder to read

IMO it reads pretty well, has pictures in between, text highlighted in black and the paragraphs are not excessively large. I prefer to write like this because to me it is less harsh visually than using multiple colors to highlight, but I can see why some prefer that format.
 
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IMO it reads pretty well, has pictures in between, text highlighted in black and the paragraphs are not excessively large. I prefer to write like this because to me it is less harsh visually than using multiple colors to highlight, but I can see why some prefer that format.
Tag some users to inspect it.
 
Good af thread no one notices how big temporal peaks are for a good hairline, main reason why brad Pitt can have any haircut
 
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IMO it reads pretty well, has pictures in between, text highlighted in black and the paragraphs are not excessively large. I prefer to write like this because to me it is less harsh visually than using multiple colors to highlight, but I can see why some prefer that format.
I will give it to you, next time make sure that it has table of contents or headers please
 
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Hi someones know à very good surgeron for temporal peak ?
 
Hi someones know à very good surgeron for temporal peak ?

Juan Couto, Bijan Feriduni, Munib Ahmad, Patrick Mwamba, Pradeep Sethi, Raymond Konior, Zarev, Blake Bloxham.
 
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"Temporal peaks usually can make a hairline look much lower or higher than it actually is, just by their positioning - more frontal (shortening the distance between each contralateral peak) or more posterior (increasing their distance). We can rapidly infer from this that the closer they’re together, the smaller the forehead looks and the wider they’re positioned, the opposite occurs."

brad-pitt-leonardo-dicaprio-lko-002038-big.jpg


We can see this pretty clearly if we look at Leonardo DiCaprio and Brad Pitt. This was actually pointed out to me by Dr. Jose Lorenzo when we were discussing hairlines and temporal peaks."

Note how despite being a hair transplant surgeon, who should know this better than his own name, this was pointed to him by another doctor (!).

Browsing the web we can see that the bluepill reigns supreme with most hair transplant surgeons, this is a response by one:


"Dear Jacob_93, Thank you for posting this question. You’re quite observant. It’s true: overly low or full temporal recessions (where the hairline meets ends on each side of the hairline) are a common sign of a hair transplant procedure. Why is this? Because it’s a subtle aspect of the artistry of hair restoration, and many doctors who are less experienced are not aware of many of the hundreds of the aesthetic decision making that goes into hair transplant surgery. The truth is that many patients will ask for *more* hair in these areas, and to make their patients happy, the less-experienced hair transplant surgeon will oblige, and “fill up the corners” as my patients often say. It’s intuitive that hair in the corners looks more youthful. However, it’s important to remember that not everyone can pull off that look. Full corners are more suitable for more round faces, African American faces, and some other cultures where the hairline is naturally rather straight across. You appear to be a Caucasian man, and you would look definitely odd with temporal recessions that were aggressively filled in. It’s a sign of having been “done” in this industry. As the old adage goes, “the good thing about the results of a hair transplant surgery is that they are permanent; the bad thing is that they are permanent.” As men of Caucasian descent tend to have oval faces, being conservative in the temporal recessions is key. Many Caucasian men *start* to lose hair in this very area. If it is overly-done, and too aggressive, then as more hair loss occurs in the future, it can look incongruous. You’re only 32. You could develop crown loss at age 40. Then by 45 you might have a tennis-ball sized spot in the crown. Achieving 100% total crown coverage with hair restoration surgery is difficult, and occasionally impossible due to intrinsic factors of the patient (eg: hair shaft diameters, hair color vs scalp color, etc.) So, suppose you’re going to have a surgery to cover the bald spot when you’re 45...so you will have some coverage, but it will be evident that there’s a light area and you have some hair loss in the crown. However, if your temporal recessions have been 100% corrected, and there’s no loss there, that usually looks unusual in a Caucasian man. So, it’s often best to tread lightly in the temporal recessions as the newly constructed hairline must literally be timeless in nature. It has to look natural when you’re 32, and when you’re 82. I hope this information is helpful to you. Kind Regards, Ken Anderson, MD, FISHRS"

The coping and gaslighting is too much. Jfl at the round face ethnic teenager cope, let's take a look at some white men over 30 years old with prominent temporal peaks, edited to have the "age coherent perfect hairline" with less prominent temples that this man thinks is ideal:

2179173_999.jpg


He may have a point in the sense of covering more balding areas in the future, but he is wrong with regards to aesthetics.
This is a great morph by Feriduni, it's Brad Pitt (old caucasian man with age incoherent hairline, like that doctor would say) with recessed temples on side profile. Left original, right morphed.
Celebrity4-voor-28b7b693.jpeg
Celebrity4-na-6b95a7fe.jpeg


Big descension, looks much worse with less prominent temples.

Tyson Ballou (another old caucasian man with age incoherent hairline) edit found here
2183648_3A17EC3F-3BAF-4AF6-9B75-45AEB2DC2BF0.jpeg
2183676_1608751606758.png


BIG descension too.

The only thing that I see that is common for white people with that kind of temple prominence is that they have an ideal forehead slope, not vertical but close to it.

Tyson+Ballou+12.jpg
3997562207_5e03973e9a_n.jpg


It think that kind of almost straight forehead is needed to the temporal peaks to look natural (and not the bs of round face teenager non caucasian guy said by that doctor).

Basically, find a blackpilled surgeon and have a forehead like that (or a custom forehead implant before the hair transplant if yours is too sloped).
Most hair transplant surgeons seem to don't know shit about what makes a face good looking from what I've read.

This clearly blackpilled, high IQ man had a hair transplant with the goal of having a Brad Pitt/Tyson Ballou type hairline, with very prominent temples. Could he have a much better face and be leaner? Yes. Does he look way better than before with his recessed temples? Yes.

Final result


Copy/pasting last video's description

"The temporal peak is a luxury necessity in hair restoration and is a point of definition and individuality. Temporal peaks frame a face and produce symmetry by the effect eyebrow contouring. It is the third component in a triple layer framing effect; the eyelashes contour the eyes, which are contoured by the eyebrows, contoured by the temporal peaks - a rarely discussed concept (Lawlor K, 2021).

They have a drastic effect on the perception of facial proportions and produce a point of focality that the eye is drawn to. Loss of temporal peaks produce a larger face, that can look "balding" and less attractive. With loss of this vertical framing, increased facial width becomes visually unaesthetic as youthful aesthetic ratios are absent, and facial fat becomes perceived as overweight/bloating.
In opposition, bringing in the temporal peaks improves ratios and enhances all facial components by creating a narrower field of view via a closer frame. This effect draws the viewer's eye inwards when looking at the face - lips, eyes, brows and forehead become exaggerated, which is perceived as more youthful. In essence, temporal peaks create physical identity and closely associate with youth.

Coronal sites produce the flattest angles and are best suited for temporal peak design to mimic nature as close as possible. As an implanted graft heals and scarring occurs around it, it actually rises several degrees upwards from the original angle implanted. This is why having the graft as perpendicular as possible is key to a natural outcome when healed. Sagittal sites are often used on by others in this field for temporal peak design, producing a design where hair exits the skin at a higher angle, sticking out in a way that does not occur in nature.
This is why temporal peaks are often botched, yielding an unnatural appearance that does not enhance the aesthetic profile - in fact it draws attention to something "off" in the person. Temporal peaks are, unequivocally, the most advanced area in hair restoration surgery. Simply put, they will either enhance or disfigure a person - there is no middle ground. "


Shutterstock_5068968cz.jpg
rs_634x1024-131218110518-634.brad-pitt-04.cm.121813.jpg
123c2b708405d6c94ae33e2ef285ae95.jpg
f73fe17fdf229ef85da19693bee69484.jpg


That kind of hairline with prominent temples is one of the key aspects to look good with a buzzcut or pull any hairstyle. Both buzzcut and curtains look equally good on both. I'm starting to think that this is what women refer to as "effortlessly beautiful", someone that looks good no matter what...basically, brutal upper third pill. Does someone look good just with a certain hairstyle despite top tier features in general? 100% sure subpar hairline and/or forehead.

And then some hair transplant surgeons, who should know this better than their own names, have the audacity to say that a Norwood 1.5-2 hairline with receding temples is ideal for men...unbelievable.

PS. this is all I know about hairlines, I'm not an expert. Please don't dm me for hair advice, use the forum's search function or contact an expert instead.

Just use a pencil.
 
@NegativeNorwood

I am interested in getting a hair transplant, specifically targeting the restoration of my temple points. I am seeking a surgeon who has a proven track record in performing successful temple point work.

After conducting some research, I have come across Mwamba and Feriduni as two surgeons who have demonstrated exceptional temple point work. However, the cost per graft is quite high, which is a bit discouraging. Based on my analysis of similar cases, I estimate that I would need approximately 2500 grafts to achieve my desired outcome, which would cost around 10,000 Euros.

I am wondering if there are more affordable options available for this type of procedure, or if temple point work is exclusively performed by only a few surgeons worldwide. For reference, I am currently at a NW2 stage of hair loss.

Thank you for any advice or recommendations you may have.
 
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@NegativeNorwood

I am interested in getting a hair transplant, specifically targeting the restoration of my temple points. I am seeking a surgeon who has a proven track record in performing successful temple point work.

After conducting some research, I have come across Mwamba and Feriduni as two surgeons who have demonstrated exceptional temple point work. However, the cost per graft is quite high, which is a bit discouraging. Based on my analysis of similar cases, I estimate that I would need approximately 2500 grafts to achieve my desired outcome, which would cost around 10,000 Euros.

I am wondering if there are more affordable options available for this type of procedure, or if temple point work is exclusively performed by only a few surgeons worldwide. For reference, I am currently at a NW2 stage of hair loss.

Thank you for any advice or recommendations you may have.

Honestly, there are no cheaper alternatives for good temple work. The other doctors mentioned above are even more expensive, or around the same price and booked for 2 years. It really sucks, but only a very few knows how to transplant temples, it's almost a monopoly.
Either Feriduni or Mwamba are an excellent choice, the price is steep but worth it. A bad hair transplant is very noticeable in real life, and a bad temple transplant even more. Better to be safe than sorry and go to someone that really knows how to transplant them, as not having temples is better than having botched temples.
Best luck with everything man!
 
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@NegativeNorwood

I am interested in getting a hair transplant, specifically targeting the restoration of my temple points. I am seeking a surgeon who has a proven track record in performing successful temple point work.

After conducting some research, I have come across Mwamba and Feriduni as two surgeons who have demonstrated exceptional temple point work. However, the cost per graft is quite high, which is a bit discouraging. Based on my analysis of similar cases, I estimate that I would need approximately 2500 grafts to achieve my desired outcome, which would cost around 10,000 Euros.

I am wondering if there are more affordable options available for this type of procedure, or if temple point work is exclusively performed by only a few surgeons worldwide. For reference, I am currently at a NW2 stage of hair loss.

Thank you for any advice or recommendations you may have.
Do you have pics of your hairline and pictures of your goal hairline?
 
just get a temple peak hair system tbh
 
Honestly, there are no cheaper alternatives for good temple work. The other doctors mentioned above are even more expensive, or around the same price and booked for 2 years. It really sucks, but only a very few knows how to transplant temples, it's almost a monopoly.
Either Feriduni or Mwamba are an excellent choice, the price is steep but worth it. A bad hair transplant is very noticeable in real life, and a bad temple transplant even more. Better to be safe than sorry and go to someone that really knows how to transplant them, as not having temples is better than having botched temples.
Best luck with everything man!

Agreed, that does seem to be the overall advice that I have received when discussing this topic with others. It appears that there are no hasty options for this procedure, as I won't be opting for a quick procedure in Turkey this time around.
Do you have pics of your hairline and pictures of your goal hairline?
Attached. The case study has negative temple points. Mine do not look that regressed thankfully. I would like the hairline to be lowered in conjunction.
 

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Agreed, that does seem to be the overall advice that I have received when discussing this topic with others. It appears that there are no hasty options for this procedure, as I won't be opting for a quick procedure in Turkey this time around.
I don't see pictures and you didn't write anything lol
 

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This is my hairline before the transplant I think we have similar noorwood I got a hair transplant like 3 months ago in my area
Number of grafts used, the total cost of the procedure, and was the temple point region addressed during the hair transplant?
 
Number of grafts used, the total cost of the procedure, and was the temple point region addressed during the hair transplant?
They did 2500 grafts it was 10.000 dallors the temple points were addressed slightly the lowered my hairline about 1.5 cm
 
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Oral minoxidil gave me temporal peaks i never had before.
 
no

no side effect or unwanted facial body hair?

/
anything past 5mg and i get side effect, no side effects on 5mg, i did get some minor hair growth on unwanted areas, but it does not bother me at all.
 
Oral minoxidil gave me temporal peaks i never had before.

You sure you didn't have them before but you didn't pay attention to them before receeding?
That would be giga lifefuel if true, but I think that the most fortunate people get the temples they had before receeding with fin + oral minoxidil.
I lost around 600-700 grafts when my hairline "matured", my temples were small to begin with but receeded. If oral minox gives me my hairline and temples back, that would mean a 200-300 grafts hair transplant just for the temples instead of 800-1000 grafts for the entire hairline+temples. I've been on 5mg oral minox per day for two weeks (2.5mg per day two weeks before), and I'm seeing thicker beard and eyebrows, I hope it regrews my hairline and temples back to it's original state too, that would be a huge improvement tbh.
 
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Just sent you a private DM on my temple peaks if u could rate them please
 
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This is my hairline before the transplant I think we have similar noorwood I got a hair transplant like 3 months ago in my area
They’re your results after 3 months?
Extremely impressive.
 
I tried getting some density in the temporal region but the shape of my skull didnt allow it to work so well. The hair doesnt come out like you'd imagine like in a morph. Its hard to explain
 
I tried getting some density in the temporal region but the shape of my skull didnt allow it to work so well. The hair doesnt come out like you'd imagine like in a morph. Its hard to explain
Did you try and gain density through a hair transplant or a different method?
 
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